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Maintenance Schedule for Phantom 3A, is there?

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by Kima kim, Sep 7, 2016.

  1. Kima kim

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    As with our cars, we follow a schedule set by the manufacturer for a regular maintenance check.
    Is there a similar schedule that we should follow for our Phantoms to make sure that they are fit to fly for a long time?
    Any "wear-and-tear" parts that we should replace in time?
     
  2. Flipsonic

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  3. Meta4

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    Your car has many, many moving parts.
    Your Phantom has 4 brushless motors that are extremely low-maintenance.
     
  4. N017RW

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    Many folks overlook the idea that Phantom's are really toys, probably because of the cost.

    They are considered disposable items which are marketed to the general public requiring NO past r/c, electronics, mechanical, or even photographic experience. It has been reported here in the past that DJI has said they're expected to last about 9 mos. to a year (when a new model comes out).

    Thus DJI designed them in such a way that they really have no user serviceable parts beside props and batteries.
    Props will last for years if not damaged or excessively tightened; motors can last hundreds of hours depending on the quality of, the only wearing part(s), the bearings.

    Batteries??? Depends on proper use and storage
     
    #4 N017RW, Sep 8, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2016
  5. Kima kim

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    DJI said this? Be happy to see the link.
     
  6. Kima kim

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    Yes, it's quite obvious...although your reply has not really answered my query.
    Anyway, Flipsonic's did.
     
  7. N017RW

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    No link.
    Just something I read in another post here.

    This is not saying that they won't last years. My P2-NV is going strong since May '14 but like all r/c toys they are not considered 'Durable Goods'.
     
  8. AlexSP

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    I disagree
    I disagree. First, I strongly doubt DJI would even hint at such, mostly because it'd be a shot in their own feet considering that absolutely none of their competitors make no such claims. Not even makers of smaller, toy-like, semi-disposable drones. Certainly not 3DR, Yuneec or Autel.

    As you said, there are lots of P2s still flying and - I'd guess - even more P3s with hundreds of hours of flawless service. The oldest P3P in my fleet (my favorite btw, even more than the I1) is 1-yr old already, flying professionally quite a lot, all the time, and is 100% fine. I feel t's safe to assume that if I don't crash too hard it'll last for many more yrs too, maybe requiring a new motor or something at some point (maybe, my P2s didn't and were sold almost as new).

    They can be repaired, parts can be replaced, they can be rebuilt, improved, both Tx and AC. Even in light of issues (cracks, ESC or compass error, whatever, which other brands suffer too), they are as durable as the pilot make them, like most other durable goods. So, unless it can be proven somehow that DJI officially said something like this, or even implied, I consider a myth being spread through repetition, something totally lacking consistence.
     
    Kima kim likes this.
  9. N017RW

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    Of course folks (hobbyists) can maintain them for years.

    But there is no long-term maintenance list or internal user serviceable parts, models are turned-over every 9 - 12 mos, increased parts integration as the model line matures and no previous r/c experience required to operate.

    Just cause it costs hundreds of dollars does not change what it is, a consumer grade, Chinese, toy flying camera.
     
    BigAl07 likes this.
  10. AlexSP

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    I agree that cost has nothing to do with being consumer or pro, that´s why I never mentioned it. I also agree it is consumer-level, but then most other everyday appliances we use are: BlueRays, refrigerators, many things that also don´t require intensive maintenance but do need service or repair on occasion.

    Yes, it has a short turnover period but then 99% of stuff we use today have too. That alone doesn´t make it "durable" or "non-durable", especially if you consider that most "pro-level" appliances also demand maintenance, sometimes even more than "consumer-grade" ones.

    The P3 has few parts that (may or may not) need regular replacement, which are the props and batteries. it´s consumer-grade mostly because it´s user-friendly, but it´s not an expensive toy. Wear-prone parts like props and batteries can be replaced by anyone, no need to be a hobbyst. If something else needs service, it´s just like a car, microwave or refrigerator, we have to take it to a shop or specialist.