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Mac to support P3

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by AirApparent, Jun 27, 2015.

  1. AirApparent

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    What is a good Mac (desktop or laptop) to support 4K video and editing? My late 2008 just can't handle. Going tomorrow to buy a new one. Thanks all.
     
  2. Carver1000

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    iMac 5k Retina display.....or a Mac Pro with a nice 4k monitor attached to it would be the only way to view full 4k resolution as far as I know. I am most likely going with he iMac. They start at around $2k compared to the very expensive Mac Pro which is geared more for people who edit professionally and need more horsepower.
     
  3. PhantomFilters

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    My MacbookPro Retina i7 late model works quite well with the P3Pro. 4K is a beast to work with on almost any system, but it is doable. Just think of your workflow - do the editing first - and the effects last, or 4K can get very heavy to work with.

    Using Final Cut Pro X by the way.
     
    Wayne Coutts and Netsquash like this.
  4. AirApparent

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    Thanks. Keep it coming. Pulling the trigger tomorrow and just want to get a good platform.
     
  5. PhantomFilters

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    How much do you want/have to spend?

    Do you need/want a laptop or a desktop Mac?

    I would imagine any new Mac would (theoretically) "support" 4K editing etc. But how pleasurable it would be, will differ greatly depending on how much money you spend.

    Dedicated graphics is probably a good idea (my MBPr has a dedicated GPU as well as the integrated Intel GPU). 16GB is probably a good idea. A fast CPU is nice when rendering (one of the times multiple cores is a quite significant benefit.

    It might be easier if you'd share what you were considering. And what form-factor you prefer. You can spend e.g. $15k on a MacPro setup with large external Thunderbolt storage, external monitor and an external 4K monitor to see the result in full glory. But a lot less will do :)

    You can get inspiration from Macbreak Studios

     
  6. AirApparent

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    Thanks for that. $15K way out of the question. Was actually looking at the iMac 27in with 5K display. Would double down on the RAM but not really looking to go crazy. This is a hobby for me not a living. I probably should've stated that in the beginning. I do appreciate the feedback and thank you for your time.
     
  7. PhantomFilters

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    The 5K 27" Retina iMac is absolutely more than enough! :)

    Less will work too. But I think you will be very happy with that choice if you want to spend the money.

    I like this Apple Buying Guide - that can sometimes help you get Apple hardware at a good time in the product cycle, so you have a "new" computer for longer, so to speak :)

    http://buyersguide.macrumors.com/#Mac

    Looks like a reasonably good time to get a 5K Retina 27" iMac - even though sadly still not updated to the new Broadwell Intel CPU:

    http://www.macrumors.com/2015/05/19/apple-releases-new-15-inch-macbook-pro/

    What version/specs are you considering? While expensive, SSD (Flash Storage) is truly a wonderful addition to any computer. Is probably the single thing today that makes a computer feel snappy. At the same time, having plenty of storage when doing video editing (and storing all that Phantom 3 footage) is truly nice too. Since it is a desktop computer, I think you could do fine with adding an external (fairly cheap) USB3 hard dive and using that for storage (rather than the faster but more expensive Thunderbolt external drives - that also comes in very expensive SSD-versions by the way). For the system-drive, I'd seriously consider an SSD, if you feel you want to spend the money.
     
  8. jcknows0

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    IMHO you would be silly to buy Mac Pro at current stage as it should be upgraded by end of year and will then be able to accommodate 5k monitors as well as significant gains in SSD speed as well as processor and memory. If you want to get retina iMac fine but you have to at least get 3k+ with upgraded processor and GPU (upgrade memory yourself and save a lot)
    Retina mbp is prob your best bet price wise even 2014 model should be fine as you will need a 4k TV/monitor anyway to review footage but will save you 1k T least towards it while also giving you portability in the field.

    I went hackintosh route as all 4k Mac solutions seem less than ideal right now and I'd rather put extra money towards having a complete 4k kit (gp4s w/ hand gimbal, p2 gp4, p3p and who knows maybe a black magic cam)


    As for these MOV files I feel like you lose some quality compared to gopro 4 files AFTER they are uncompressed by studio as this gets footage up to 10 bit standard for 4k. Any thoughts? I've only reviews a few files briefly so I could be wrong.
     
  9. eMaX

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    I strongly disagree with some of the video. First of all, avoid RAID5 and use RAID10. (Next, not even mentioned in the video, don't use RAID as your backup solution, but use a Tape Library like HP's MSL2024, and some decent backup software like Tolis Group's BRU).

    Rather than connecting a large storage to your Computer, connect it to a Linux box. Here's a setup that shows that: http://www.mnott.de/latest-pornographic-addition/

    Your Linux box can be cheap, and will always be cheaper than the Mac Pro setup. Mine is already 8 years old, and I've added disks, an external disk case, the tape library and the UPS over the years.

    Now, speaking about Video workflow, I really just do basic stuff like cutting together scenes, adding an intro, etc. I do all that on my macbook air from 2013 and connected to a thunderbolt display. I've a thunderbolt lacie 1 TB SSD connected to the display (or rather, a Belkin Thunderbolt Hub, but that's details), for local high speed storage on top of the 500 GB SSD in the macbook air.

    On that, I do things like this:

    The Macbook Air performs well for the cutting. The real thing about the cheap setup is to not do the video compression there. That would take forever and lock my Macbook Air in place. Rather, I export the video in full size, with no compression, to my Linux box, and do the compression there.

    For that, I've - in a way - replaced the Mac Pro, or what I'd use it for, by a shell script:

    https://github.com/mnott/vcompress

    HTM,

    M