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Loading photos/video onto flash drive

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Bassplayer838, Aug 30, 2016.

  1. Bassplayer838

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    I used my P3P to shoot photos of a race track from above to use for posters. I loaded the photos onto my computer. I then put the photos onto a flash drive to give to my client. I could open the photos w/o a problem. When the client put the flash drive in his computer he got a message telling him to format the drive. I put video on a cd and flash drive and when the media was put into a computer it showed nothing was there. I ended up using the original micro sad card that the videos were on and put it into the computer and it transferred w/o a hitch. Will I always have to use the original micro ad and put it directly into a clients computer or am I missing the right way to transfer the media?
     
  2. Meta4

    Meta4 Moderator
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    Something's not right there.
    You're talking about digital files - they're not magic and don't disappear on their own.
    If you could see them on the USB drive, your client should be able to as well.
    Perhaps your client isn't very computer savvy and is confusing himself?
     
  3. matti

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    What computer did you and your client use? What format did the flash drive and the CD use?

    FAT32 (Master Boot Record partition map) is currently the most compatible cross-platform format. DJI Phantom AC formats the SD card in this format.

    FAT32 is a legacy file system in the Windows world. However, it is still widely used as almost all Flash-based drives use this format. Mac OS X supports this format for both reading and writing, as does Windows. It has notable limitations, including difficulties with files of size larger than 4 GB (this is why long Phantom video clips are splitted in 4GB chunks ... and yes, this happens also with exFAT in the Phantom).

    Other formats might not always work on foreign systems:

    exFAT, also known as FAT64, is a newer file system developed with the simplicity of FAT in mind, and also to alleviate the FAT32 limits. Mac OS X 10.6.5 and later versions have full read/write support for it. Unlike FAT32, it does NOT have a 4GB single file limit. However, Linux support for exFAT is poor to nonexistent.

    NTFS is the current preferred file system of Windows (beginning predominance circa Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000, and including Windows XP). Mac OS X has read only support for this format. It has no capabilities to write to an NTFS drive without additional software.

    Mac OS Extended a.k.a. HFS+ is the principal file system of Mac OS X. Windows has no native support for this format.
     
    28wins likes this.