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Lipo Batteries

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by MarkNH, Sep 16, 2015.

  1. MarkNH

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    If you have a lipo battery in a metal box in the basement and it goes off is the hazardous gas dangerous upstairs or just in the immediate area?

    Mark
     
  2. Fyod

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    You've been reading some frightening lipo bedtime horror stories, haven't you?
     
  3. MarkNH

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    There is a possibility that it can happen and I would rather not have a burned down house and 4 dead pets.

    Mark
     
  4. Fyod

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    You do realize that there are stores and places that regularly stock them and nothing ever happens? As long as you store your (not puffed) batteries around 60% charge in a dry, low ambient temp, and don't puncture them, there's virtually no chance for them to cause harm to anyone.
    If you wanted to be 100% safe, you'd have to store them in a cement enclosure outside, far from anything flammable.
     
  5. DJi Newbie

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    You can buy battery bags desinged to stop fires from batteries if it will help you sleep well
     
  6. MarkNH

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    Each to his own. My original question is about the gas although I did mention fire. If it's in a metal box you won't have a fire just gas.

    Mark
     
  7. Fyod

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    Well, if you take into account the properties of various gasses, of course they could get into the upper floors. Would it be a dangerous concentration of the air? Hard to say. Your best bet would be ventilation in the basement by opening a window or something there to allow the gasses to escape outside, not into the living area.
     
  8. MarkNH

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    I didn't come here to get critiqued my question is about the gas from the batteries.
     
  9. Buckaye

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    I would imagine unless the pets are in the very vicinity of the fire - the gasses probably would diffuse enough that they would be ok.... on the other hand - if they were in the same room with lousy ventilation - that might be a different story.
     
  10. N017RW

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    Why would you risk your life/safety to what anonymous posters say on a chat forum?

    Your question involves chemistry, physics, poison, medical, etc.

    Be real about your expectations before getting offended.
     
    wali likes this.
  11. LuvMyTJ

    LuvMyTJ ADMINISTRATOR
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    Hello Mark. It is a pleasure to welcome you to the Phantom Pilots forum. I hope that you will take advantage of the benefits that come with membership and that you will be able to use the forum for the exchange of innovative ideas and as a resource for current developments in Phantom quadcopter’s.

    Lipo safety is a topic that pops up regularly here, and that is not a bad thing as people new to RC's may of never have had any experience with the care and handling of lipo's. It seems the posters in this thread are genuinely trying to answer your question. They are answering it from their point of view on how they read the question.
     
  12. Fyod

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    I'm sorry Mark, I'm not trying to critique, but it is impossible to answer your question having zero knowledge of what your basement/home looks like.
    The battery isn't a bomb. If you have it in and enclosure, than in the very unlikely situation that the battery combusted due to puffing and lithium reacting with the air, it will burn off in a while, most of the fumes will be contained in the box and probably will slowly escape, dissipating in the surrounding air and not causing harm to anything.
     
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  13. wali

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    lithium is good if u r a bipolar .. kidding :)

    just put them in a steel box over two plastic bottle of water ( 1L) so it can kill the fire right away...
     
  14. aburkefl

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    There are a number of LiPo battery videos on YouTube - you can garnish quite an education about LiPo batteries there.

    The most recent LiPo batteries for the Phantom 3 are labeled as an "intelligent flight battery." One of the no-no's of LiPo batteries is storing them at full charge. If you see a battery that used to be shaped like a brick and now it's shaped like a giant cigar, that's probably what happened. The Phantom 3 battery can be programmed (there are defaults as well) to slowly dissipate its charge over several days.

    Another no-no is letting them get hot and stay hot - don't leave them laying in the car/truck during warm weather. And let them cool off somewhat before you try to charge them.

    I keep my LiPo batteries in an ammunition box, but I don't keep the box sealed. Someone pointed out one day that if the box is clamped tight and a fire breaks out inside, the box could become a bomb.

    Frankly, as far as overall concern about LiPo batteries, I would be more worried about fire other than the spread of gas.

    Let's not get too carried away however. Many hobby stores are chock-full of LiPo batteries in storage and display cases. A LiPo battery can sit on a shelf for a very long period of time if it's only charged to about 50% - 60%. It will hold that level for quite some time and not be dangerous.

    Art Burke - N4PJ
    Leesubrg, FL
     
  15. Fyod

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    This is a very bad idea. A lithium fire cannot be put out with water, on the contrary when water enters a damaged lipo, the reaction is even more violent.
     
  16. BigAl07

    BigAl07 Moderator
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    As noted above water won't help with a LiPo fire. When a LiPo does "go ballistic" the gases are pretty nasty and of course they would travel up into the home if there was no other (and easier) route for it to take. With that being said you can only "realistically" do so much before you become borderline obsessed.

    Here's how I "Store" my LiPo (not the P3 batteries they are stored in my aircraft case because it's always mission ready). On my basement floor(6" concrete) I use standard CMU block (Cinder Block) that have between 2 and 5 holes in them. Each battery is in it's own "cell" and over each one is a zip-loc bag of sand. I do this in "hopes" that if a battery gets to the point of combustion the freezer bag of sand will help slow/extinguish the issue. I also have a single CMU that I charge all of my "NonSmart" LiPo in that is just like my storage units except it's close to an outlet and stand alone just in case.

    Storing the batteries at 40% - 60% is key in battery health.
     
    #16 BigAl07, Sep 17, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2015
  17. Clipper707

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    I prefer to store my batteries in the crib of a sleeping child. If the baby starts crying, I'll know something is wrong and I can save my batteries.

    Does anybody know which gases are released by LiPo batteries?
     
    #17 Clipper707, Sep 17, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2015
  18. BigAl07

    BigAl07 Moderator
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    Lithium Hydroxide is the main component from the breakdown of the battery itself. If ignition is present (and most likely that's what we're talking about) then you add the burning of plastics and other internal components. None of which you'd want burning in your home if you could help it.

    Lithium Hydroxide inhalation has many symptoms (Sore throat. Cough. Burning sensation. Shortness of breath. Labored breathing.) but lung edema may not manifest until a few hours later. If you do inhale the gases from this process you'd be well advised to seek medical attention sooner than later. Be sure to let them know you've inhaled Lithium Hydroxide so that you can get the proper treatment right from the start.
     
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  19. Mark Lawson

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    What LiPo batteries are you referring to if not the P3 batteries? Aren't they LiPo in the P3? And for all of you guys storing your batteries at 50% charge, do you charge them up right before flights then? Or are you just always flying on 50% charge and half the flight time?

    I was always pulling my previous flight battery, allowing it to cool before charging and then sticking back into my flight case. I have them labeled numerically and rotating them constantly. But it's wrong to keep them charged and ready to go?
     
  20. BigAl07

    BigAl07 Moderator
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    I keep my P3P batteries in a Ready state and they are kept on a rock hearth. I have a bit more faith in the P3P "Intelligent" battery than I do in my old battery charges.

    I've not had to worry about my P3P batteries being at 50% yet simply because I fly it every day right now. Keep in mind that my P3P is still new to me so for now it's "where ever I am" LOL. Hope that makes sense.