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License when required

Discussion in 'Phantom 1 Help' started by Buk, Oct 15, 2013.

  1. Buk

    Buk

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    Reading the paragraph below and operating a Phantom V1 and a Fat Shark 250mW, is an FCC license required in the United States?

    If this paragraph is not relative to obtaining a license for operating a Phantom and a 250mW Fat Shark, where is the regulation located on the internet so I can read it and attempt to understand it.

    Thanks,
     
  2. miskatonic

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    This question came up a few weeks ago. To FPV legally you will need an FCC amateur radio license to operate legally within the US.
     
  3. Buk

    Buk

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    Where on the internet is that stated in an official FCC web page/site that you must be licensed to operate at 5.8Ghz and what mW? Not that any government web pages are functioning during this shutdown.

    Sorry, I'm trying to find and hopefully understand the FCC document that clearly states this regulation regarding 5.8.

    Is flying around with 2.4 of the Phantom transmitter/receiver then not regulated?
     
  4. Driffill

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    5.8ghz @25mw or below does not need a licence, the use a higher powered transmitter you need to be licenced! I can't remember when I got that info, but I'm an Australian, and I know the majority of the US regs related to RC+cameras.

    I'm not exactly sure what the transmitters Mw rating actually is? The 2.4 range would have a limit but it could be much higher (or lower!).

    EDIT: done a quick search, 2.4ghz has a 10Mw limit.
    http://www.air802.com/files/FCC-Rules-a ... ations.pdf
     
  5. miskatonic

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  6. fizzviic

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    Is a technician license (lowest class of ham licenses) sufficient for FPV?
     
  7. miskatonic

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    It looks like the technical is all that is needed.
     
  8. Driffill

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    That link has no more info than is already in this thread? You could link this thread on the rcgroups one and help them out lol.

    2.4Ghz (with our set up) has a 10mw limit
    5.8Ghz has a 25mw limit.
     
  9. r3tro23

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    anyone here have the license?
     
  10. Ots

    Ots

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    An Amateur radio license is required to transmit video at 5.8 GHz only if one is transmitting with greater than one watt (1000mw) of power.

    There are three levels of license in the US: Technician, General and Amateur Extra. The Technician level is sufficient for transmitting video on 5.8 GHz at greater than one watt of power.

    William
    KK6GBY
     
  11. r3tro23

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    Hey, can you link where you saw that? I trust you, just want to see it in writing.
     
  12. Ots

    Ots

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  13. r3tro23

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  14. Buk

    Buk

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    The above information leads me to ask:

    Is a Fat Shark A/V transmitter/receiver set an ISM device? From what I've read and DO NOT understand 5.8Ghz is in two bands, one being ISM and the other not and requiring licensure.

    Shouldn't there be a Part 15 compliance label on Fat Shark equipment if ISM and less than a watt?
     
  15. fizzviic

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    Thanks for the replies
     
  16. Ots

    Ots

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    If you read the opening lines of the link carefully you will see that the bands were originally set aside for use with industrial scientific and medical equipment (ISM). However, in the early nineties the FCC allowed three of the bands to be opened for unlicensed communication equipment.

    Fat Shark and others are operating in this 5.8 GHz band and no license is required for low power transmission.
     
  17. Buk

    Buk

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    Thank you for taking the time to make these clarifications.
     
  18. Ots

    Ots

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    I've learned some new information and I thought I would pas it along.

    Everything I put forth in this thread is true as long as we are talking about using a transmitter that carries FCC approval and has an FCC identifier number on the transmitter. That is, anyone can use it as long as it has < 1 Watt of power.

    If it does not have FCC approval an amateur radio license is required to use it, regardless of its power output. If it is FCC approved then there will be the FCC logo on it and it will have the identifier number on it. This is required. If it has "FCC" stamped on it only it is not approved. The FCC logo has one 'C' inside of the other and there has to be the number.

    So the link I posted above that explains that the use of < 1 Watt transmitters is OK without a license is referring to the use of approved transmitters only.