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Lens Cover for Filtered Lens

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by bkushner, Aug 28, 2016.

  1. bkushner

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    Does anyone one of a lens cover that will cover the lens with an ND filter on. My existing cap won't fit. Thanks
     
  2. SnoozeDoggyDog

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    It might help telling what filters you have so someone with the same can chirp in. I have the tacos which fit the standard covers
     
  3. bkushner

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    My bad, I have the Neewer set of ND filters...thanks.
     
  4. skipilot1

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    I have the PolarPro Cinema Series and the PolarPro lens cover that also does away with the DJI original gimbal lock.
     
  5. Andy9

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    I wonder, why you ever need the cover, as the filter already protect the lens.
     
  6. msinger

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    It'll protect the filter from getting dirty and/or damaged.
     
    bkushner likes this.
  7. Andy9

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    OK, that's your choice.
    My opinion is, that the cost for the filter is almost the same as for the cover. We are talking about such small filters needed for the drone camera. I would rather by one filter more than the cover.
     
  8. WetDog

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    One nice scratch in your filter and you can ruin a shot. Contrast goes all to hell. The filters are VERY soft and not at all scratch resistant. I'm sure Polar Pro, etc. would give you a hug for your thinking but personally, I'd cover the filter.
     
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  9. skipilot1

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    The OP is really going about this all wrong. One filter won't do it. The 8/16 combo is fine unless you are using little or no horizon so it is for certain types of shots. The 16 is too dark on some days and the 8 too light on some days. I bought the PolarPro Cinema Vivid Series. It has a 4, 8 and 16. I bought these because they have a rotating polarizing filter attached which is good for bright sun over water, beach, snow, roadways and other highly reflective surfaces. You can turn them from full on to off or in between.

    You need a cover! When I first got them I used the 16 with polarizer on during a sunny day at Ocean City, MD. It worked beautifully and combined with the manual video settings was the best video I had taken to date. It also made post-production SO much faster and easier. There was some. When I went to wipe it with a camera cloth as they do get some moisture from sea spray or grass when on the ground, I noticed some minor abrasions on the filter. I sent PolarPro a photo and asked to purchase a replacement at a discount and they sent me a new one for free.

    I washed the cloth and air dried it. Later I used the 8 filter and the same thing happened. I again contacted PolarPro and they again sent me a new filter for free. They told me not to use a standard cleaning cloth and instead use the microfiber bag that comes with each lens. They have not had a scratch since. I also then purchased a small cleaning pen with a fine brush and smudge remover. It works perfectly and removes the fine dust without scratching.

    So here is the takeaway:

    1) Get as many filters and types as you need for the conditions you are filming.
    2) It may be made of hard glass, but the coatings are soft so you need to take special care when cleaning them.
    3) Once you have invested some money in filters, don't be foolish and buy the right cover if you are going to leave the lens on the camera when storing. This is a good idea since swapping filters is a lot easier and faster than messing with the original UV Phantom lens cover which is harder to put on and remove.
    4) Listen to the folks on the forum and do it right or don't do it at all.

    I did look at the Neewer but it seems it does not indicate whether you are at 4, 8 or 16. You just have to figure it out somehow.

    There are cheaper lenses out there which is fine. I am not telling you which ones to buy. The ones I bought were a bit pricier than some but are extremely well made and screw on and off smoothly and quickly. I was also extremely impressed with their service and happily surprised at their free, no hassle replacement.
     
  10. WetDog

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    The variable filters actually don't need numbers. You just dial the filter in to the appropriate shutter Spode and go.
     
  11. skipilot1

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    I don't quite understand. Can you explain that a little better?

    If the shutter speed is set at 50 or 60 and ISO at 100, then the only variable is the aperture which is fixed. That is why we need the ND filters to compensate for the aperture settings. I have an idea using the marked filters. How do I know using the variable filter?
     
  12. WetDog

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    Perhaps I mangled that a bit - With a variable density filter, you dial the up the intensity of the filter until you get to the requisite shutter speed. So you really don't have to know what ** value ** the ND is actually at as long as you get the correct exposure.