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Knowing how close you are to objects

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Vision Discussion' started by Shrimpfarmer, Jan 14, 2014.

  1. Shrimpfarmer

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    I am spending some time now learning to fly the P2V by reference to just the screen (FPV). I am thinking of making a short film demonstrating what an object looks like at a given distance. I will place markers at 1ft intervals from a post and then film the view from the onboard camera as I slowly move towards the post. If I film with another camera side onto the P2V as I do this I should be able to place both clips side by side and thus become familiar to how things look.

    If anyone has already filmed a similar test please point me to your video.
     
  2. W.A.R.

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    Sounds like a great idea to me! It's hard to tell the distance from something with the wide-angle lens.
     
  3. BenDronePilot

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    It's better if you don't fly in wide angle, not to mention the fisheye. Use only narrow view (90 degree) for a more natural perspective.
     
  4. Pull_Up

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    Agreed that it's tricky with the wide FOV. The good thing is, from my experience, it makes things seem closer than they are. If I'm getting up close and personal with a tree or something for a specific shot I'll go up to it and eyeball exactly how close I can get, then monitor the screen for the actual shot. You can use this to your advantage for those "I can't believe you didn't hit that" shots. If you are just going to hoon around in FPV then definitely narrow the field as much as possible.
     
  5. Shrimpfarmer

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    I only film using the narrow field of view as I really don't like the fisheye effect that much so thats the view I will be using for the test. Might as well do a comparison film with camera set to wide though for good measure. I agree that if your able to walk up to the target then that is where you should film from so that you have the best possible view to avoid a collision. Such a test film might be worthless but it gives me something to do with it :)
     
  6. Klaus

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    Hi
    Very good idea, I am looking forward to see that.
    I also find it very difficult to judge the distance, not only on the screen but also when I just look at the PV directly from behind.
    Often, when I try to get close to something, and think "now I can't get any closer" and then walk up to have side-way look, the PV can be up to 2 meter away from the subject :shock:
     
  7. Hiway

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    That is a wicked tip- and I am going to modify it down a notch for my purposes... I don't have fpv yet, but, I can take and hold the Phantom manually and grab some shots at close range- go back and bring them up in the editor and on the lcd screen in the field, and get a feel for how the shot will look at the ranges I do feel comfortable flying at to see if my perceived footage comes close to actual.

    I am itching to get a fpv set up, but other priorities in life keep putting that gear off.
     
  8. garygid

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    Has anybody tried hanging a "bumper" in the visual field about 1 meter in front of the propellers?

    Sort of a visual "training wheel".

    Perhaps use the propeller guard with the perimiter strings to support a light rod,
    with a ping pong ball suspended from the end, hanging down a few inches?.