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JPEG vs JPEG-Raw

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by Houston, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. Houston

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    Which is best setting? For P3pro doing still & video


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  2. 480sparky

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    Depends on what you want to do with the images.

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  3. Dirty Bird

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    Depends on if you want to do post processing. You have jpeg (smaller) & raw (huge but contains all the data for post editting). You can also choose Jpeg + RAW so it saves one of each.
     
  4. Houston

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    Thanks I have Lightroom updated


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  5. Houston

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    ISO, I've heard lower the better


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  6. tcope

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    You may not completely understand the difference. JPG files are processed and compressed photo files. Applications that can display JPG files are a dime a dozen. RAW photos are unprocessed photos. There are fewer applications that can read RAW files. These files are not processed or compressed so they tend to be quite large. Most people process these files using an editor and then convert them into a more acceptable format, such as JPG.
     
  7. 480sparky

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    A JPEG is like a sandwich you get at the lunch counter.

    You order a ham and cheese with extra bacon, on a seedless bun, and you get exactly that. You really can't do much with it to change it other than scrape off some of the ingredients. And you can't change anything because all the kitchen has in the pantry is ham, bacon, cheese and seedless buns.

    Raw, however, is like having access to the supplier of the cafe. If you don't want ham & cheese with extra bacon, you can swap out the ham for turkey. And what kind of cheese would you like....American? Swiss? Colby? Would you like your bacon crispy or soggy? Bun or sliced bread? White or wheat?

    Don't like sandwiches? How about some beef stew. Or potato soup. Or a hot beef w/mashed potatoes and gravy.

    How about a side of fries? Regular or curly? Iced tea, or soda? And a nice slice of apple pie? Sure, and warm it up. With a dallop of ice cream. And cinnamon all over it.



    JPEGs are basically a finished, processed image. Most of the data created by the sensor is tossed out in generating the JPEG. This leaves you with little data left for editing.

    Raw is ALL the data the sensor created, with minimal processing needed to convert the analog signals into digital form. With ALL the original data available, your editing choices are vastly increased.
     
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  8. MichaelR

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  9. Meta4

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    All over the internet people are asking what is the "best" of everything.
    There is no best. If there was, there wouldn't be so many choices.
    Better to look for what's best for you and what you want to do.

    First .. JPG and Raw are for stills. They are irrelevant to video.
    2nd .. unless you are a hotshot photographer and want to dabble with a lot of processing, jpg is probably all you'll need.
    Best way to find out is to shoot some of each and see what they do for you and what the differences are.

    I shoot jpg all the time because I can't afford the time Raw would take when I'm shooting for a big panorama and the quality is good for me.
    Here's an example:
    [​IMG]
     
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  10. 4wd

    4wd

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    The only problem with recording RAW + JPG is the extra wait time as it writes.
    If you have Lightroom or some other software which can deal with RAW there's no contest which is 'best'.
    But the JPG will look better without any processing required which may suit many.
    I actually enjoy taking a little time to work on the best 2 or 3 images from a flight.
     
  11. BVC

    BVC

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    I shoot in Jpeg+raw

    However the raw files I average around 18mb in file size. Can suck up a 256gb hard drive real quick ;) Edit best ones, toss the rest. Keep the jpegs (I like) as fluff to the viewing eyes
     
  12. WetDog

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    Even the biggest RAW file is nothing compared to low rez video. Couch change. The Phantom RAW files are Adobe DNG - there are hundreds of programs that can read them - even for tablets. But you must do something with a RAW file - it is purposely set so the contrast curve and color are pretty flat and uninteresting. You have to bring out what you want.

    If you are at all serious about stills, you will shoot in RAW - the stock JPEGs are 'OK' but can be made much more interesting. But they give you the option. Same as video. You can push your video straight out to YouTube or you can spend hours getting it right.

    Whatever floats your boat.
     
  13. Ed209

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    I shoot jpg mostly. I'm not a pro photographer and the results are usually good enough for me. I tend to take many pictures of the same subject at different settings so that I can achieve the desired effect. ImageUploadedByPhantomPilots1452557720.008968.jpg
     
  14. jimerb

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    If you have Lightroom or camera raw, raw files are significantly better. You can adjust the images with much more latitude.

    You will have softer images with raw because the images are not processed by the camera for output. You will have to make the adjustments to taste. Lightroom makes this a total breeze.
     
  15. BVC

    BVC

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    Here's an example of RAW vs Post Edited RAW.

    I am by no means a professional or have a great idea of what I'm doing. It's a steep learning curve for me and while challenging it's only something that will get better with time and practice. But these photos are pretty good idea just how much color and adjustment can be had..

    My goal when I was playing around was a snowy tropical setting so I focused heavy on the greens and blues
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  16. m0j0

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    Raw is the best it is basically a digital negative and retains all the information you can get from your cam. JPEG does not.
     
  17. With The Birds

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    Simplest anology, raw file is the negative (think film canera) and jpg file is the print. In fact, dng is an acronym for digital negative).When you dropped your films at the photo lab (before the convenience of digital cameras) the person sitting at the machine made all sorts of decisions adout the correct exposure and colour balance. They also gave you your exposed negatives back and if you didnt like the way the prints looked you could have them re done. Working with the raw files gives you a lot more control of the end result.
     
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