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How to install TS832 with H3-3D gimbal

Discussion in 'FPV (First Person View)' started by TTGator, Jun 17, 2014.

  1. TTGator

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    Been searching this forum and the internet all morning. Head getting foggy. Finally decided to go with the TS832 transmitter for my P2 w/H3-3D gimbal and GoPro Hero 3+. So now I'm researching how to install it...

    Can anyone kindly point me to instructions (preferably a youtube video) showing the install procedure? It doesn't seem like a plug-n-play cable exists for this (like it does for the AVL-58) to plug into the camm(?) port on the P2 and use the power/video feed from the H3-3D. In absence of that, I need to know the best placement, wiring patch in, etc (you know, installation instructions) :)

    Thanks!
     
  2. QYV

    QYV

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    this youtube video is getting a bit dated now (it's for a H3-2D not a 3D) but it's still great and I suspect the gimbal is not the part you need help with... there's tons of gimbal install videos.

    the remaining aspects of this video are what you're looking for. Are you putting in an iOSD Mini? it's really worth the extra $. anyway the above video starts with an internal iOSD Mini mount, and then shows how to use the colored cable that initially ran down the leg of your phantom - that cable has a video (from the gimbal) and ground which need to go to your video Tx, and a power/ground you can use to power the video Tx. From around 1:22 he describes thus: "the yellow and brown cable is your video out and ground... and red/brown is your live/negative that goes to power your transmitter"

    If you're NOT installing an iOSD mini, you can just patch directly to the input on your TS832 as thus:
    Phantom ribbon cable yellow/brown pair: yellow will go to the Video In, and brown to the cam gnd
    phantom ribbon cable red/brown pair: red goes to DC+ and brown goes to DC-

    I'm not directly familiar with the TS832 but I looked up a wiring diagram which I'm posting below, seems like it only has 1 connector which carries both power (and ground) and video in (and ground), so just take care you patch the right cables from the ribbon cable. It's the left part of the image below. I didn't try too hard (because this is your job) but the only TS832 install videos I could find on youtube also included iOSD mini

    [​IMG]
    so from the above diagram, you'll be using DC in + and - as well as Video In and cam gnd. (you will NOT use Cam V out)
     
  3. TTGator

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    I JUST found that same video about 30 minutes ago. By far the closest to what I need. He is using an immersionRC, but I think the concepts should translate directly for the TS832 (as far as I can tell).

    I wasn't planning on using the iOSD mini as most of my real usage will be for filmmaking in fairly close and controlled environments. For actually flying a plane or something with goggles it would be great, but I'll just be using the LCD5802 to help frame my shots.

    Thanks for your help!
     
  4. QYV

    QYV

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    you're welcome. I'm 99.9% sure I got the cabling right in my description of what goes where ("if you're NOT installing iOSD mini...")

    it's just up to you to patch the right cables from the phantom's ribbon into the right ones from the TS832 cable. It does directly show in the video which cables are what, but he's patching them into the iOSD Mini cable so which colors go where are definitely different in the video
     
  5. TTGator

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    OK screw it... I just bought the iOSD mini. Heard enough people praising it I might as well do it early on and not have to rewire things later!
     
  6. QYV

    QYV

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    hehe it's really useful, are you clear on exactly what all it does?

    imo the most useful features are:
    -ability to see exact battery voltage / life left
    -see number of GPS satellites locked
    -see home point icon
    -see ascent/descent rate

    the iOSD mini overlays telemetry info on the broadcast signal, but your GoPro footage is still raw and doesn't have all that stuff. it's very useful for keeping an eye on your battery level since you can't always see that from the ground... also if you start doing longer distance flights if you're more than a hundred meters or so away you can lose orientation... on the display there's a little diamond icon showing the "home lock" position (the place the Phantom will return to if Failsafe is triggered) so basically you can use the icon on the screen to point your phantom back at yourself and fly home.
     
  7. TTGator

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    Ah very cool. Did not know about the GPS satellites or the Home Lock parts. Very useful indeed!

    I still haven't gotten brave enough to test out the Home Lock part. Sometime soon I'd like to do that. I was thinking the easiest way was to fly it 100 yards or so away in a nice empty field and then turn my controller off?
     
  8. QYV

    QYV

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    ok first off, are you clear on the difference between Phantom Mode and Naza Mode? the default mode is Phantom Mode, unless you've change it that's what you're in. There is a better way to test/enable Failsafe manually without turning your controller off. see below copy/paste from a prior post of mine:
    OK so, right now in Phantom mode the 2 control switches on your remote don't do anything (during flight) right? In the Phantom assistant software, go to the Basic / RC tab. see at the bottom "Control Mode Switch"? there's only 1 thing you can change, on the right the dropbox (by default) says Normal Fly. If you change that to Failsafe, then while your phantom is up in the air if you click the right switch full down the Phantom will go into Failsafe (the lights on the bottom normally green will start blinking yellow) the same as if it loses touch with the RC . wherever it is, the P will fly back to it's home position (the GPS position it locked when you turned it on) and descend until it lands. You can flip the control switch back to normal and resume control at any time (yellow blinking lights go back to green). I basically use this feature as a "fly back overhead and start descending" autopilot... especially useful if I'm WAY up in the air (at 2m/s descend rate, that's a while to descend from 200m or so) or very far off and just don't feel like manually flying back overhead. just flip the switch any time to resume normal control. this is in many people's opinion much safer and better than turning off the RC to trigger failsafe

    of course you'll want to test it at short range before relying on it at longer ranges... remember:
    if the Phantom is below 20m and Failsafe is triggered, it will ascend to 20m, fly to home point, and descend
    if the Phantom is above 20m, it will fly to home point and descend

    so that's how you can both enable the ability to trigger failsafe and resume normal control, all without turning off your RC, and you can test at short range and feel comfortable that failsafe works... liek you said fly it off a short distance, trigger failsafe, watch the results. resume manual control at any time by toggling the switch back up

    sometimes the GPS lock position isn't like EXACTLY perfect, for me it's common for it to be 1-3 meters off the EXACT point it took off from, that can be due to subtle changes in the earth's magnetic field in different parts of the country/planet. however it will get **** close and for me personally I never let Failsafe actually land it, I just flip the switch and resume normal control then land manually. actually, I never land anymore I catch.

    speaking of catching: many folks around this forum have agreed with me that catching is preferable to landing for several reasons, not the least of which is ANY lateral movement on touchdown can cause a tipover and broken props.

    I recommend reading this post I've made previously with some good protips, especially the part about catching and the video I link. That same post also expands on Phantom Mode vs Naza Mode. Naza Mode gives you different flight modes that honestly can be more confusing than normal. I personally stick to Phantom Mode with manual Failsafe and don't bother with Naza mode, home-lock mode, course-lock mode and all that noise. NAza mode also has FULL MANUAL control if you accidentally flip the switch wrong which is basically death for a non-expert pilot like none of the flight assists are active in full manual. I've never even done it, no desire to.
     
  9. TTGator

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    Thanks SO much for all this info! A while ago (before I even got my P2) I saw part of a video where a guy was explaining and demonstrating the home-lock and course-lock modes. Home-lock actually sounded pretty cool and something I might actually use one day. I didn't realize that I had to change the settings with the assistant software though. I did know there was a full manual mode and that I didn't want anything to do with that! Haha. I think I'll set it to Naza Mode (to get the home-lock ability) with Failsafe, but without full manual if that's an option. Seems like the configuration I'd want.
     
  10. QYV

    QYV

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    I'm not 100% sure but I think that "flip a switch to get failsafe" only happens in Phantom Mode. In Naza mode the switches become what they are labelled, GPSvs ATTI or CL/HL

    anyway have fun!
     
  11. TTGator

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    Alright all the parts came last week and I picked up a soldering kit at Home Depot this weekend and put everything together! I've powered it up and I can see the video output on my monitor (The RX-LCD5802). Tonight after work will be my first test flight.

    You and that video were invaluable. With the iOSD device, the video was exactly what I needed except I had a different transmitter. I think the wire colors coming out of the transmitter might have been slightly different, but I think they were the unused wires anyway.

    I also had to cut the barrel connector off of the power supply that I bought to recharge the monitor because it was not the right size and solder on the barrel connector/cable that came with the monitor. I was expecting the power supply to have two wires inside, and became slightly nervous when I found out there was one wire with several stands of small wire surrounding it, not unlike a coax cable. After some googling, I determined that the outer wire was the ground and I just twisted them all together to solder to the black ground of the barrel connector's cable.
     
  12. QYV

    QYV

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    excellent! glad we could help. sounds like you went through the same thing we all did, splicing the power cable for the receiver :)

    bon voyage for your first flight!