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Help replacing P2V+ ESC board

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Vision + Help' started by stanfran, Jan 14, 2015.

  1. stanfran

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    I recently crashed my P2V+. When I opened up up I just got a beeping noise from one of the ESC's. the orange cable going into it was damaged and the esc board itself had some damage. I ordered Part 7 ESC 2.0. I confirmed with DJI that this version was compatible with early P2V+'s. I am definitely not very good at soldering but I have replaced my motors successfully a number of times. I replace the esc, soldered 3 motor wires and the two wires back to the board. When I powered up I got nothing from that esc or motor. No lights no motor. At least with the broken ESC I was getting power to the board(beeps and lights). Any suggestions on what I should try? Bad connection to main board? Tried re soldering it three times. I also ordered the cable package and replaced orange cable.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. RDCF550

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    I'd have to guess it's a very bad solder joint form that pic. The G (ground) doesn't really look connected at all, and I can't really make out the V (voltage) spot, but its doesn't look that great either. It's possible for a solder joint to 'feel' solid, but have no electrical connection at all, so I'd start with redoing them for sure.

    The huge solder blobs on the plastic there should also be removed as you don't want them in there to get loos and short something out.

    It takes a little bit of heat to do those joints properly, as they are heavier power connections, but don't overdo it either of you'll nuke the wires and get a short.
     
  3. CityZen

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    If you're not getting a light or a beep, then you've got no power going into the ESC. If I were you, I'd brush a bit of flux on the solder connections, then one at a time hold the wire with some tweezers (or forceps or needle-nose pliers), heat the joint up with an iron until it forms a nice shiny ball, then let it cool until solid before moving to the next.
     
  4. J.James

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    I just replaced a main board in my vision a few days ago and had to resolder in all my escs and every thing was all good and just a about and hour ago I powered it up and was getting the beep beep beep thing that sounds just like after you do a firmware update/I thought for sure a plug was not in all the way some place. But it knew it as some thing with one of the escs and one didnt look to be the best solder connection and so I tried to see if it was on good and the beeping did not go away. So I hit it with the soldering iron and put some more solder on it while holding it down firm with the back end of my tweezers whole soldering it and then it stopped beeping. and I'm real glad it happened when it did and not when I was in the air.
     
  5. stanfran

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    Thank you for the responses. I wil re solder this weekend with above tips. I believe I just realized why I cant solder that great! I cant see! I bought a pair of reading glasses yesterday and now I can see every detail of where I am soldering. amazing the difference.
     
  6. PhantomFanatic

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    Your solder connections don't look good. I wish I knew how to access the soldering instructions that I posted on the forum!
    Does anyone know how? We should make it a sticky.

    Anyway, your solder connections are blobs. That means you didn't heat up the connection, for a few seconds, prior to applying solder. What wattage soldering iron do you have?

    Get a solder sucker, heat up the connection and push the button (after compressing the spring) on the solder sucker while pressing it against the molten solder.

    Make sure to use electrical solder and not solder for copper pipes, etc. Use rosin core, with tin and lead. Lead is safe if you don't inhale the fumes. I've soldered since age 6 to my current age of 62 and no lead poisoning. My sister did stain glass work for a few years and she tested positive for lead!

    Solder suck the solder off of the wires. Assuming your soldering iron tip was tinned properly wipe it on a wet sponge with 90% of themwater squeezed out. Do not have wrap the sponge around the tip, let the sponge lay flat, then wipe one side, then the other side. Do this before and after soldering.

    But, first make a mechanical connection first. If it is a printed circuit board (PCB) heat up the wire and then apply a small amount of solder to the wire, NOT the soldering iron. The wire should be stiff, without a blob. Push the wire into the hole, turn the PCB over and bend the wire so it will stay put.

    If the PCB has a foil ring around the wire hold, press the iron's tip on the ring and press it against the wire. Let it heat for a few seconds, then apply the solder to the wire, next to the PCB a but not touching the iron's tip. You should see the solder being 'sucked up' the wire an onto the PCB a ring.

    The joint should be smooth shaped (no blob)'and it should appear shiny. If it looks frosty, you have a cold joint, if it is a blob, you may not have waited long enough to apply the solder. Other causes are a tip that wasn't tinned to begin with or your soldering iron's wattage is too low. A 45" watt iron is good for this king of work. A variable soldering iron station, with different tips, will allow you to solder most anything.

    Okay, if the PCB has a ring on the underside of the board, check to see if the wire is soldered good. If not, add some solder there. There are special wire snips for this, but get a wire cutter and cut the excess wire off. Make sure there are no sharp edges, if so, trim them off.

    In case you need a new tip, buy a medium chisel tip if your iron has adequate wattage. Let the tip heat for several minutes. Wipe both sides of the tip on the wet sponge and immediately apply a very generous amount of solder. It will smoke, don't worry about that. After about 20-30 seconds, wipe the tip on the sponge. You should have a shiny tip all over the tip. If you wipe on the sponge, it will stay that way for a long time. Buy a new tip when solder won't melt on the tip.

    That and tinning are the only times that solder should touch the tip.

    p.s. I hate Radio Shack soldering iron's! Buy a Weller and if you plan on doing a bit of soldering, now and then, buy a Weller variable wattage soldering station with a soldering iron holder and a sponge and its depression. I hope this helps.

    p.s.V2. After reading the other posts, I have something else to add. Using tweezers or another tool to hold the wire in place while applying the iron and the solder causes two problems: First, you run out of hands! More importantly, the tool used to hold the wire down acts as a heat sink. This makes it hard to heat up the connection and it can easily cause cold soldering joints. Since you don't have enough hands, people resort to putting a lot of solder, on the tip and then applying that to the joint. So, that is why you bend the wire on the underside of the board. If it is a terminal connection with a hole in the center, insert the wire into the hole, bend it back around with needle nose pliers.

    IF you have just a solder pad (no hole) to solder to and a wire to solder to that, that is where a great tool, with many names, comes in. It will hold the wire, higher up and you just solder. If you want one, msg me and I'll find a link. BUT, if you have no one to help you, use needle nose pliers to hold the wire up higher on the insulation. With enough practice it is possible to hold the pliers and with the same hand, apply the solder! Use the palm of your hands to hold the pliers in your hand and use your thumb and index finger to apply the solder.

    Whew! I think I covered it all - again. We really should make a sticky of this. How is that done? The first one might be best, I don't know.

    Well, this could use a lot of editing, but I hope you got the message!
     
  7. J.James

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    Very good instructions. Tho in the phantoms board and the escs they use flat soldering pads to solder to instead of a ringed hole. (wish they still made stuff for threw hole soldering)
    But the same still applies and also if its not already from your first attempts. pre tin the pad on the board before soldering the pre tinned wire down to the pads.

    and if you get it soldered and still have beeping check all you plugs every were to make sure the 4 plugs that do in to the escs are in all the way and that you didnt acidendly melt any of them. Then if the beeping still is going. Check all the plugs on the naza controller to make sure they are all in and in the right places if you happened to remove any at all to do your work. if you did make sure you not only have the in the right spots but that none are flipped over the wrong direction.

    and if still beeping look all around and make sure there are no solder balls or any thing like that shorting any thing out or any broken wires touching each other.
     
  8. jason

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    When I replaced all four motors I removed all the ESC boards I used helping hands to hold the boards while reconnecting motors wires. Doing that way made the job a whole lot easier.
     
  9. PhantomFanatic

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    Yes, I thought I covered soldering pads. If not, hold the wire with needle nose pliers, up high on the insulation. If the pliers touch the wire, it will act as a heat sink and you will get a cold soldering joint. A little practice and you don't need three hands! I think Harbour Freight sells the device I was referring to.
     
  10. PhantomFanatic

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    Working out in the field, alone, I had to develop creative methods! But, by all means, if you have help, use that help! But, it is good to learn the solo method for field repairs. (Although you can get 12VDC soldering irons, buy a 1,000 watt inverter. No, you don't need that much, but if you can afford it, it is great when the power goes out! Do NOT attach to your home wiring! Plug devices into the inverter.

    Why? I said this elsewhere, but the transformer, on the pole, works both ways. 115VAC in equals 7200VAC, plenty to kill a lineman working to get your power back on. If you have a solar installation, you need an automatic disconnect.
     
  11. J.James

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    hey I just noticed some thing on the esc in the picture. Just wondering if any one might know what the stamped F on it means???

    Ive noticed some replacement parts have a K inside a circle rubber stamped in white ink which I always assumed was some sort of quality contoll thing like that it was passed and OK or some thing and I dont recall ever seeing an F before on any thing.

    So I'm hoping it dont mean F as in fail. Because if it does that could be a problem.
     
  12. jason

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    Helping hands is a tool and a person. :roll: