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Help.. Long exposure...how do I get shots like these at the beach?

Discussion in 'Photography and Film' started by tml4191, Oct 14, 2016.

  1. tml4191

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    What settings do I have to input for me to get shots like the attached image I found on google? I understand these are long exposure shots, and I am aware of how to do them at night, but how exactly do I get these types of shots during the day? Does this specifically have to be shot only during sunset/sunrise? I was about an hour away from sunset, and my attempts to get long exposure wave streaks did not yet meet success. Any help is appreciated. P3P is also what I am flying.
     

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  2. With The Birds

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    Hopefully you aren't intent on emulating this too precisely, it is horrid- dreadful white balance, probably a badly blended composite shot and oversharpened, amongst other things.

    Ok. It is possible to get nice movement in the water with your drone. You can go all out silky smith if you want.

    For a nice blur to the movement fit an ND8 or 16 (32 may be handy if you can get your hands on one) and shoot early or late. The light is best then anyway. Go for 1/2 to 3 seconds in a hover.

    If the light is too bright to get over 1/2 sec shoot multiple frames and do a stack, align and merge for lighten. You can go out to many minutes with this technique if you have enough frames.
     
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  3. tml4191

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    Thank you^ time of day seems to be important here.
     
  4. With The Birds

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    Yes, dawn and dusk do give longer exposure times. We also have warmer light and if we are lucky beautiful sky's. You can still create the effect if a longer exposure at other times however by stacking multiple frames as I have suggested. Works particularity well with water falls also.
     
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  5. Jnnyr

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    it's all done with ND filters and tripods. While the drones do have gimbals and can seemingly hold their place, none of them would ever be kept still long enough to effectively take a long exposure shot.
     
  6. With The Birds

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    I am sorry to disabuse you of your notion however to claim the phantom is unsuitable for long exposure work is not true.

    What do you call a long exposure?

    The phantom 3 birds, in a stable hover, will give you a good number of keepers out to 3 seconds. Longer is possible. This is significantly longer than is required to produce a nice motion blur effect in seascape photography (1/4s to 2sec is very effective).

    With rudimentary photoshop skills you can easily stack and blend multiple frames to produce longer exposures also.
     
  7. Jnnyr

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    I guess you're correct that definitions need to be clarified. 2 seconds....perhaps. I do much longer so no, it would not really be suitable.
     
  8. With The Birds

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    In the parlance of photographers long exposure most commonly describes the use of a shutter speed that will blur or obscure moving elements of a scene or object while rendering motionless objects as still. For the puurposes of the OP's Question anything over 1/4 sec TV will achieve the effect depicted in the sample image he posted.

    If you find your phantom can reliably shoot a 2s TV and you require a longer you can easily achieve this effect by stacking and performing a lighten blend in photoshop. The result appear to be a single exposure being the sum of the TV employed for acquisition of the source images.
     
  9. Jnnyr

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    I do astrophotography so our definitions of long exposure will be different. The little blur photography (oceans and rivers) I've done with my DSLR's I've used very dense ND filters so my exposures were a bit longer.
     
  10. With The Birds

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    Good... you know all about the stacking techniques then (esp for removing noise). The stack and median blend is also very useful in removing noise with the phantom. ND's have their place in landscape work no doubt. Esp if you want that flat smooth dreamy look.
     
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  11. tml4191

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    Thank you all for input
     
  12. flowrider

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    This photo is a single image probably using stacked filters such stacked ND and graduated ND filters. I don't think you'll get this with a drone to be honest. The depth is too great and the image quality too high. Drones are great photo takers for what they are but they don't match a full frame sensor and high end glass like this photo was taken with.
    EXIF from the photo:
    Canon 5D2, ISO 100, 2.5 second exposure, f/22

    Image address on Flickr ~ Bronte Beach Sunset
     
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  13. With The Birds

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    At f22 ISO 100 and TV of 2.5s there isn't much in the way of ND or grad filters.
     
  14. flowrider

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    If you check the link and his tags and were to believe it, he used a 3 stop graduated ND filter on the sky (not too sure if it's a soft or hard grad). Of course I would likely blend several shots together to do this as well since I don't have any filters to fit my DSLR glass. I wish I could shoot landscapes like this but sadly I'm a people photographer.
     

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  15. With The Birds

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    I can believe a 3 stop grad was used. Especially after having another look at the image. It has hit me now why it Looks off. It's not the over sharpening or the white balance, it's the fact that the foreground is so bright in contrast to the sky. You will seldom if ever see this with the naked eye so the brain (or more precisely our expectation of how things should look) struggles to relate to it.