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Heatsink Paste for WiFi Unit?

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Vision + Discussion' started by MapMaker53, Dec 10, 2014.

  1. MapMaker53

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    I'm considering adding a layer of silicone heatsink compound to the top of the wifi unit in my P2V+_v2 after seeing that DJI changed the solid cover plate that was used in the v2 version to one with holes for the v3 version, I assume to dissipate heat and help prevent the wifi unit from overheating. Looks like it would be an easy application of the compound. A compound like this.. http://www.radioshack.com/radioshac...ink-compound-2-pack/2760255.html#.VIg4xmdbAyM

    You can see the new wifi unit top surface grill design in this photo from the rcgroups.com forum. [​IMG]

    Anyone have any thoughts on this?
     
  2. msinger

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    What about modding the Wi-Fi unit lid by drilling holes in it to match the above photo? You might get more mileage from that mod.
     
  3. saltire

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    +1
     
  4. MapMaker53

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    I was assuming that metal sheet was a permanent part of the wifi unit and thought drilling would pierce the electronic unit it was attached to. Is the solid metal sheet a separate piece on the v2 version that comes off? I don't have my unit with me at the moment to go exploring inside.
     
  5. CapnBob

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    Attached Files:

  6. rbhamilton

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  7. slothead

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    I am a NASA consultant and I can tell you that we stopped using silicone paste many years ago because it was virtually impossible to get off if it caused any problem. What we use now (and have for years) is a product called "Chotherm" (and some other product names I am sure), which comes in sheet form and provides almost as good a thermal conductance as the old silicone thermal grease.
     
  8. CapnBob

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    Listen, Heat Sink Compound is NOT for use as a coating.
    Bad, Bad idea, you will cook your unit.

    If used in that way, it will act as a blanket and actually hold heat in.
    It is meant to fill air voids between thermally conductive surfaces.
    The bare metal is the most efficient radiator of heat.
    Do NOT cover the radiating surfaces.

    If you need more cooling, you add surface area (fins, etc.) or air flow.
    Take a look at your computer's CPU heat sink.
    Lots of BARE METAL.
     
  9. CapnBob

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    Obviously, you must disassemble the unit first.
     
  10. MapMaker53

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    Thanks for the helpful feedback, guys. Had just been kicking some thoughts around about it in my head.
     
  11. CapnBob

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    I.M.O., Arctic Silver is vastly overrated and expensive. The company claims that AS-5's thermal conductivity is 8.7 W/(m·K). However, a study led by the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory found that it was only 0.94 W/(m·K). The other flaw is that it contains electrically conductive metal particles; the silver. I have seen capacitance issues at higher frequencies. A good Boron-Nitride and oil-based product such as MG Chemicals "Super Thermal Grease" is preferable in my book. no electrically conductive particles, and boron nitride by itself has a thermal conductivity of 6.6 W/(m·K)
     
  12. burlbark

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    Real world testing has shown Arctic Silver to be a top performer. I tested the capacitance of arctic silver and it did have a minute amount of capacity similar to my test leads overlaying each other. I have zero drop out issues with my wifi unit now and it has been months since I found the issue and performed the mod.

    Super thermal grease claims 3.0 W/m·K . The data sheets show it all. It also has no dielectric data on there data sheet, says tests in progress.

    If there is a better paste to use I am all ears and would love to see some numbers from real world use :D
     
  13. CapnBob

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    Well, I used the boron-nitride based product, and I have zero drop out issues as well.
    My point is that there is VERY little performance difference in what is out there.

    Here are your real world numbers: This study compares 80 different thermal compounds. The temperature difference from the top to bottom of the list was 5°. On average, then there is a +/- 2.5° swing from median. Using one over another will neither cause, nor ensure against heat issues.

    Use what you like, just use something.

    http://archive.benchmarkreviews.com/?op ... mitstart=1
     
  14. msinger

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    CapnBob, did you happen to snap any pictures when you did that?
     
  15. CapnBob

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    Well, no. I just snapped the results, for both the emi shielding and the venting of the WiFi module. It's pretty much basic stuff. I you need a how-to on R&R of the Wifi Module, there are a few threads showing it on this board. Just pop the holes in while you have it apart.
     
  16. msinger

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    CapnBob, yep. Just wanted to check with you because I know you do things the right way :)