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Flying at high altitudes and transport questions

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by stani123, Jul 2, 2015.

  1. stani123

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    Hi, I am planning to take my Phantom 3 to Himalayas and will be hiking over 6000m and planning to fly it, any one had experiences flying at that altitudes? Also regarding transporting it on the plane, anyone had issues with that? I know some airlines dont like batteries
    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Matty4

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    I'm interested in the responses too.
    I'm flying domestically in the morning and want to take my P3 with 2 batteries too.
    I have a hard case for it all to fit into but unsure whether to remove the batteries and hand carry them.
     
  3. Mako79

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    Most planes require you to carry them on. If there is an incident with battery, it can be dealt with immediately. If its inside the checked in luggage, there is nothing they can do.

    Flying altitude would be interesting.
     
  4. Green_Phantom

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    The biggest thing with most Pelican type cases is that they're water and air tight. That can become an issue when you take them on a plane and the pressure changes. It'll try to expand when the plane is at altitude because even though the plane is pressurized, it's still less than what it was at takeoff.

    Most of these cases have valves built into them that will allow air to come OUT of the case to prevent the seams from breaking, latches coming undone, etc.

    The main problem is that these for the most part are one way valves. Meaning air can go out, but not back in. This poses a problem when you're coming back down and the air pressure in the cabin starts to increase. While these cases are tough, they can actually implode and distort, possibly damaging whatever is inside.

    To prevent this check that valve and see if it's got a setting on that that will allow you to lock it open so air can flow freely in and out of the case, if not, you may want to drill a couple tiny holes into the case that you can patch up again later if you're hell bent on having a waterproof case.

    As far as batteries go, every airline is different. They pretty much all have regulations concerning how big of a LiPo battery you can bring aboard, but if I remember right, the Phantom's batteries come nowhere close to their limits.

    http://phmsa.dot.gov/safetravel/batteries
     
  5. Green_Phantom

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    As far as flying at 6,000 feet goes, I'm sure you can find a few folks around here that live in Colorado or some place like that.
     
  6. happydays

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    6,000m, not 6,000'. That's around 18,000'.
     
  7. GadgetGuy

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    He's asking about 6,000 meters, not 6,000 feet...:rolleyes:
     
  8. GadgetGuy

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    You beat me to it! I couldn't type fast enough! :cool:
     
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  9. Dome

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    I've no pratical experience at that altitudes, but here are some note to take in consideration :
    1. Barometric sensor must be in range: you are going at 500mbar instead of 1013mbar, need DJI help here.
    2. Battery works at very low temperature. This mean good storage, but bad efficiency. If you have below -20°C temperatures .. mhh that is a problem: Lipo chemistry stops (no use, no charge).
    3. Props HAVE NOT the same dragging capability. This means more battery for less work. Air is so rare at 6000m that probably 50% of efficiency must be considered true.
    4. It will be interesting to see what's happen really !
     
  10. nhoover

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    I've flown in Nepal this April. I didn't get up over 6000m this time but it sure had no problem at just under 4000m. No difference in power or control at all. And that was just a P2V+ - the P3 has more power and should be even better. DJI says 6000m but I bet it flies even higher. One problem with the P2V+ was getting satellite coverage. Many of the valleys are so hugely deep there that you get almost nothing. Getting 6 was lucky in many places. Again the P3 should be way better. I so wish I had mine for that trip, but am going back next year - with a P4 or whatever is available then.

    Carry it on in your backpack. Make sure you bring your batteries with you, not in your checked luggage. Supposedly you should travel with them discharged (or at least 50%) but no one ever checked other than a Canadian customs guy one time who asked if I had enough charge to give a demo flying around in the inspection area (I declined). I flew on a couple of flights within Nepal on Yeti Airlines and Tara Air without a problem, but the inspectors didn't look entirely happy really. One plane was so small there was no way the pack would fit in the carry one - super lucky the seat next to me was vacant.

    They are sticky in Nepal about flying in urban areas (Kathmandu/Pokhara) - but I did it anyway and had no problem. My friend who lives there and flies his P2V+ has been lectured by the police a couple of times in Kathmandu but no fines. I flew just before the earthquake (we left early in the morning the day it happened) and I heard they are more sticky now since so many people were flying around after the quakes. Have a great time and post some footage here! I am still working on mine.

    I flew there through Dubai - also no problem with drones. Flying there was fun too!

    Here's one quick shot of Kathmandu:
     
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  11. Torcan

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    Phantom has already been to Everest Base Camp
    see video here:
     
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  12. musicman476

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    I had an issue at London Heathrow last week where the initial inspector needed a 2nd opinion as to whether to let me carry phantom in hand baggage or not. He cited some issues with people flying them in the terminals. Seriously?? The supervisor gave the go ahead and I didn't have to check my pack.
     
  13. BenDronePilot

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  14. Panotaker

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    I don't think the view is going to be that much different from 18,000 feet vs 18,400 feet.
     
  15. yuvraj.lehr

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    Hey bro.. I'm planing a trip to the Himalayas from Singapore.. Landing into Bombay I hear bout customs hassling people who are trading with drones.. Did you have any such issues trading through india in anyway?
     
  16. nhoover

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    When I went to India I didn't have my drone. Sorry.