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First Phantom 333 Exemption Approved!

Discussion in 'News' started by N017RW, Jan 6, 2015.

  1. N017RW

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    Your summation is incorrect unless the Realtor is not intending to be the PIC.

    From the document you linked to (emphasis added):

    14)UAS operations must be conducted by a PIC possessing at least a private pilot certificate and at least a current third-class medical certificate. The PIC must also meet the flight review requirements specified in 14 CFR 61.56 in an aircraft in which the PIC is rated on his or her pilot certificate.
     
  2. sdtrojan

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    This paragraph seems to say to commercial pilots license is necessary, but a PPL is.

    "The FAA has analyzed the petitioner’s proposed operation, considered the comments above, and determined it does not differ significantly from the situation described in Grant of Exemption No. 11062 (Astraeus). The petitioner plans to operate in the NAS over private property while also limiting access to the property at times he is operating the UA. Given: 1) the similar nature of the petitioner’s proposed operating environment to that of Astraeus, 2) the parallel nature of private pilot aeronautical knowledge requirements to those of commercial requirements [ref: Exemption No. 11062], and 3) the airmanship skills necessary to operate the UAS, the FAA finds that the additional manned airmanship experience of a commercially certificated pilot would not correlate to the airmanship skills necessary for the petitioner’s proposed operations. Therefore, the FAA finds that a PIC holding a private pilot certificate and a third-class airman medical certificate is appropriate for the proposed operations."
     
  3. N017RW

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    I'm not a hater, nor a Lawyer for that matter, but I don't see where (you find) he can [commercially] fly before getting a PPL.

    Para. 2 says OK we'll let a PPL fly commercially in this UAS context...

    "In conclusion, the FAA finds that prior to operations the PIC must, at a minimum, hold a private pilot certificate, a third-class airman medical certificate, and completed the minimum flight hour and currency requirements as stated in the conditions and limitations below. [/u]Thus, the FAA finds relief from 14 CFR 61.113(a) and (b) is warranted. 61.113 is the CPL requirement(s).


    Para. 3 denies the request for 120 day temp. certificate...

    "In a supplemental request to the FAA, the petitioner requests consideration of a 120 day temporary airman certificate in accordance with 14 CFR 63.13, to allow him time to obtain a private pilot certificate. The requested relief is not applicable to pilot certificates because, 14 CFR 63.1, Applicability, states this part prescribes the requirements for issuing flight engineer and flight navigator certificates and the general operating rules for holders of those certificates, only. Thus, 14 CFR 63.13 does not provide a basis from which to issue a temporary pilot certificate as requested by the petitioner and the requested relief is denied."

    Please explain your position LiLPhantom if you wish.
     
  4. RJ Evans

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    Interesting piece of information. I wonder if this particular exemption is a harbinger of things to come for all sUAV operators who wish to conduct commercial video/photo aerial operations? If it is, then many of us are going to have to pony up some serious bucks for flight school. I'm not encouraged. There's got to be a middle ground here somewhere. The question is... Will the FAA be able to hash out a balanced and logical solution? So far, the only difference I have seen between recreational and commercial operations, in the eyes of the FAA, is a shutter click with $$$ attached.
     
  5. msinger

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    This is just more of the same. All petitions that have been approved so far require a PPL.
     
  6. CactusJackSlade

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    I imagine in the end the FAA will require a pilots license of some kind... think of the revenue maker that would be.... all these new FAA certified pilots.... money, money, money... Geeze just to fly over a house for sale.... on PRIVATE PROPERTY or do some "commercial" video at your OWN event?

    Absolutely ridiculous how far this has gone (or NOT gone) - below 400 feet and have some common sense guidelines/rules for consumer based "commercial" activity.... on private property even easier, a no-brainer in my book.
     
  7. SteveMann

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    I fully anticipate that there will be some kind of pilot training and certification required, but if they stick to the PPL and 3rd Class medical requirement, then they will find themselves in the same tar pit that the FCC did with the CB radio licensing fiasco in the 1970's. The rules were too onerous to follow and were largely ignored. Sure, the FCC nabbed a few, but for every one they caught, there were a thousand more on the air.

    So, if the FAA requires a PPL to fly a 3-pound Phantom 100 ft over a property to take a few photos, and DJI, Parrot, 3DR and others continue to sell tens of thousands of these craft every month, then the FAA will be overwhelmed. They just could not hope to catch, prosecute and fine enough scofflaws to make any example of them.

    And the idiots who would never have followed any rules in the first place will still fly near airports.
     
  8. Khudson7

    Khudson7 Guest

  9. N017RW

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    Can anyone of you recently licensed PPLs or others in the know estimate the cost of obtaining a PPL these days?

    I started in the early 80's and had to stop for vision issues but I had spent about 2.5K just to get good enough to have/achieve a 'solo endorsement'.

    This includes my ground/written test requirements as I passed that before ever getting in the cockpit.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  10. Couchie

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    There is never a 'canned' answer for this question. As you know from previous experience, there are requirements that must be met time wise and ability wise. Prior to a CFI signing you off for a practical check ride, he better be sure you are safe and capable. With that being said, can a person obtain the PPL with the minimum 40 hours of flight time? Sure, rare, but sure.

    A rough guess... after all is said and done... $5,000- $6,000. Again, this is depenedant on the market you are in and all the variables that apply to flying. You may ask, "Why so much?" Well, for one at my local airport, fuel for my little C172 is currently $5.84 a gallon. The little plane sucks down about +/- 9 gallons an hour. Assuming minimum flight time of 40 hours, that is $2,102.40. JUST IN FUEL!

    1) At some point in time in your training, you'll need to pass a third class medical (I recommend asap. Can't solo without the medical.)
    2) A minumum of 40 hours of flight time. (Most with a instructor, some without)
    3) Written test (100 questions, multiple guess)
    4) Check ride with either an FAA examiner or a Designated Examiner.

    You'll need the reading/study materials, some small equipment that you'll never use again if you are just flying drones... etc.

    Each one of the four steps above costs money. The medical may be covered under your insurance if you ask nicely. The flight time is the biggest chunk of money and varies widely by business, location, or current expenses. The written test, figure $50 - $100. The DE's around here charge around $300 for your check ride.

    It all comes back around to say, It depends!
     
  11. N017RW

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    That's good enough Couchie. Thanks.
     
  12. russianfront

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    What stupidity!

    My common sense approach:
    1) Make small drone pilots take a 1 day course on safety (develop it quick)
    2) Make them prove they have at least $1 million in insurance specifically for drone flights (i.e. aviation policy)
    3) If 1 and 2 above met Issue them a photo ID drone licence

    End of story. Go fly.
     
  13. russianfront

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    I took ground school up in Canada a couple of years ago and it costs $15,000 or so up here to get a private licence...
     
  14. Anon-e-mouse

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    I have my private pilots license I obtained last year in SoCal. I paid about 12K once all was said and done. I am now spending another 8-10K on getting my instrument rating. I am submitting my FAA letter in 7-10 days approx with the help of an attorney.
     
  15. MacCool

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    That's a very apt analogy. I think that's exactly what will happen