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Filters for sunrise and sunset??

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by losman26, Jun 8, 2016.

  1. losman26

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    After googling the subject, I can't seem to find clear, concrete answers. Should I go with an nd4, nd8, polarizer or something else?

    I plan on waking up at 5 am to shoot sunrise tomorrow.


    Sent from my iPad using PhantomPilots mobile app
     
  2. msinger

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    If you're shooting photos, go with no filters. If you're shooting video, an ND4 works best in most cases. You'll know if it's too dark/light once you attach it though.
     
  3. StratocasterDave

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    Do you have a light meter? I use an app based one. Does okay. Obviously not pro grade but works decent for knowing what setting works best for which filter.
     
  4. losman26

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    Just doing a litchi video. Can't seem to get a crisp clear video like in the Dji go app.


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  5. losman26

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    No light meter, can you suggest one.


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  6. BVC

    BVC

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    What app do you use?
     
  7. losman26

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    I ended up using the plain stock uv filter, because the sun wasn't that bright today. Still having horizon issues, but that could be related more to speed and turning with the litchi app



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  8. StratocasterDave

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    I use and iOS app called Light Meter. I set the aperture in the app to 2.8 (the Phantom is fixed at 2.8). I also set the iso in the app to 100 (that's what I had set in the Go App). Finally I hold the filter in front of the camera facing my subject. It gives me a good idea of the preferred shutter speed.

    Again, far from professional, but it works well for me.
     
  9. StratocasterDave

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    Losman26, do some research. I am told that you can control the horizon tilt via the c1 or c2 buttons? Never tried it myself though.
     
  10. Not A Speck Of Cereal

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    Your first step for tilted horizon issues is a IMU calibration, followed by a Gimbal auto calibration, both in the DJI Go app. These calibrations should be good for whatever app you're using when recording video.

    After that, if you still need to, you can do a gimbal roll adjustment in the DJI Go app. Ask if can't find the location in the menus to do this from.

    And you can make that same gimbal roll adjustment while flying by doing a PRESS+HOLD of the C2 button while turning the Exposure Compensation dial (the one on the right) and view your adjustments on your FPV screen, also while using the DJI Go app.

    However, I still have not yet determined of those gimbal roll adjustments are still applicable outside of the DJI Go app, such as when you switch to the Litchi app. As far as I can tell, the adjustments do not apply to video shot with while using Litchi.

    DJI has so far been mum on this on their own forums.

    Does anyone here know if DJI Go Gimbal Roll adjustments should still be reflected while using Litchi? If not, is there a gimbal roll adjustment in the Litchi app that I have yet to find?

    Thanks, Chris
     
  11. losman26

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    Found a more level surface, calibrated imu, calibrated gimbal mid air, and it seems better. Although, the horizon tilt can go out depending on speed or wind.


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  12. WetDog

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    Or, you could go out to the shooting site, turn the P3 on, look at the shutter speed from the app, move around to get a feel for how the light changes and shoot for a 1/60 or so shutter speed (or 1/50 if you are shooting at 24 FPS). It will never be exact unless you are shooting a perfectly uniform scene which would be kinda boring.

    You can also set it to manual, set your desired shutter speed and hope to hell the ISO changes will compensate.
     
  13. badawgie71

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    I actually remove the stock filter when I fly at sunrise, sunset or night time. Seem to get more clear photos that way.
     
  14. John Lo

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    Reall, sample photo if u have one?
     
  15. badawgie71

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    Here are a couple that I did in low light and longer shutter speeds without the stock lens on.
     

    Attached Files:

  16. tytlyf

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    Is that to reduce any 'flaring' from the sun if pointed directly at the sun?
     
  17. MikeyOnline

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    Call me a simpleton but if shooting photos, I shoot raw and just tap the screen on different parts of the sky to expose for those areas and then take the shot. For example, I might tap on an area of bright clouds, take a shot, then tap on the brightest part (where the sun is rising), take another shot, and then tap midway between the horizon and the top of the frame and take a third shot. With raw photos, you can generally tap on the brightest clouds to make sure those don't blow out: the ground will be dark but with the dynamic range present in raws, you can compensate for that if ground detail is important. I don't use any filters when shooting photos.

    Mike