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Fat Shark Goggles Are Fogging Up During Flight

Discussion in 'Phantom 1 Help' started by Fpvpilot, Jul 7, 2013.

  1. Fpvpilot

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    I flew FPV earlier this evening, and I had a lot of fun during the first five minutes of my flight. Unfortunately, however, my visibility became very limited due to my goggles' lenses fogging up. I suspect the humidity played a role. I had to eventually remove my goggles to see what my Phantom was doing.

    Does anyone know how to prevent the goggles from fogging up?
     
  2. Sac D

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    I was flying with two guys yesterday that both had the same issue... one of them says he is going to try installing a little fan in his!
     
  3. patc221

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    I wonder if one on the anti-fog strips they sell for the GO PRO would keep them from fogging up. We don't have much humidity where I live so I don't have that problem.
     
  4. BruceTS

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    Rain-x anti fog, I use it all the time
     
  5. martcerv

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    The anti fog strips will only work in a sealed environment, the way it works is that it draws moisture from inside the housing so it reduces the water content and so it cant fog up. In an open environment like the goggles it wont do anything, the little strip will be saturated very quickly and there is no way it can absorb all the moisture coming from you and the air. Rain-X or other antifog liquids should do the trick just make sure its safe to use on the lenses as I don't know if they are glass or plastic because I don't use fatshark goggles but most likely it should be fine.
     
  6. GoodnNuff

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    You can buy anti-fog wipes to use on ski goggles, I don't see why you couldn't use these on the Shark goggles?
     
  7. Driffill

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    Swimmers spit into their goggles to stop them fogging up??? Just sayin ;)

    I'd try the gopro fog strips before I Spray or rub fog-x on an LCD.

    The glasses fog up when your face creates a seal with the glasses and your body heat warms up the moisture in the pocket. The fog strips should help, but as mentioned they will be saturated quickly, not to much of a problem if you have a few sets with you! And for those who don't know, the gopro (and some other brands) of fog strips, are reusable!

    I have rainx and fogX, I use it frequently on my car windshield etc, I'd never try it on my TV!
     
  8. GoodnNuff

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    Has the rainX or FogX caused any permanent clouding or streaking on your glass surfaces?

    Yeah, it hasn't caused any damage to my plastic goggles or motorcycle helmet's clear plastic face shield either.

    I think something like this would be safe to use on a video screen:
    http://www.chutingstar.com/gear/fogtechdx-anti-fog-wipes
     
  9. martcerv

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    But fog strips are useless if not in a fully sealed and waterproof environment, you need 2 inside a closed gopro housing and this has no more moisture coming in once closed. Using it in open air will saturate them in minutes and even if they arent saturated they wont work on a pair of goggles. Even if they were full sealed to your face which they arent there is moisture coming from your skin that it could never absorb fast enough or enough of to make it work in any way as it just the wrong method for the task

    The spit method is the best method for dive goggles and such but there is a very important part of the spit method you dont want to be doing on your goggles. For this to work it is actually a spit and dip, you first use some saliva and rub it in then dip it in water for it to work. This rinses it off and keeps a small film of water in the lens that prevents other moisture or condensation forming on the lens. Without rinsing this method wont work and you cant really do this with electric goggles so it also rules out the spit method. Well the spit and dip itself will keep your goggles fog free but you will also destroy the screen unless its 100% waterproof so you may want to look at other methods.
     
  10. GoodnNuff

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    I lost a sentence when I did an edit before posting: I wouldn't use rain X or fog X either - too much residue leaves an oily surface.
     
  11. Driffill

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    I was poking a bit of fun with that one ;)

    The point I was making is there is lots of ways to prevent fogging, a heater element could be utilised? But for a specific use, certain considerations should be taken into account. The gopro strips are used in a plastic watertight case, containing an electronic device! Therefore a "dry" method was used. I know the goggles aren't fully sealed, but if they did have ok / good or even fair ventilation, it wouldn't fog up in the first place. Gopro skeleton housings can still fog up on the lense, I've had to use fog strips with the gopro on my car (using a vectormount) in a skel housing, I thought the wind would keep it clear

    Like I said, I'd try the strips, and not specifically the gopro ones, there are other larger ones available, before I would go putting liquids/oils/waxes on the electronics. Rainx and fogX could be jokingly viewed as "high-tech spit in a bottle" in terms of them both preventing fog. I understand people wouldn't want to spit and dip their goggles, but would you sip in a cup, mix in some water and apply that from a spray bottle???

    I wouldn't do it with spit or rainx.
     
  12. BruceTS

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    Your not putting it directly on the LCD screen, there's a lens in front that I use a Q-tip and apply. It doesn't take much and my goggles don't fog at all now. Heck I've been using a combination of Rain-x on the outer GoPro waterproof case lens, then anti-fog on the inside, plus fog strips when I go snow skiing to prevent problems.
     
  13. Mick Emmett

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    I know this is an old thread but I would be interested to know now a little time has passed since this thread was created as to whether any of the rain X/Fog X users in this thread have suffered any permanent damage to their goggle lenses. I've just got a pair of Skyzone FPV 5.8g 32 Channel Diversity Goggles, and within 10 seconds of putting them on they fogged up to a point where I couldn't see any thing (as well as having the feeling they were trying to suck my eyeballs out of their sockets). I'm a little wary of using Rain X on them, I'll tell you why. I own a Honda Goldwing Motorcycle, the wind shield comes with a polycarbonate coating (anti scratch), whoever had owned the bike before me must at one point have had a stick on tax disc holder on the screen; and when they'd pulled it off it had pulled the coating off with it. I used rain X on the screen on a regular basis and over the period of about a year the small area where the tax disc holder used to be that no longer had the polycarbonate film coating on slowly turned opaque. In the case of the bike screen it didn't really matter as it wasn't in my view of the road but if it happened to the goggle screen lenses then it would be a disaster.
     
  14. Monte55

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    I had the fogging problem also. Keeping the goggles warm before wearing them should help.
     
  15. PhantomFanatic

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    Get some SCUBA mask de-fog. Look for the highest ratings. There is an ole fashioned way, but I doubt you wish to spit in your mask! Plus, modern de-fog works better. Rain X is a possibility, as mentioned. But, I prefer the de-fog.

    Since you aren't going underwater, do the outside too. It is harmless to rubber, silicone, etc.
     
  16. Mick Emmett

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    I've only had them on once and that was inside my house where it's nice and warm, that's where they misted up in no time at all, guess I must have sweaty eyelids. I was hoping for someone that has been using something like Rain X for some time to reply and tell me how prolonged use of it has affected the lenses, hopefully not at all? As I said I'm a little wary to use it as it definitely affected the plastic screen on my motorbike over time and if it had the same effect on the goggles it would eventually render them useless, unless the rear screens can be replaced easily? Thanks for the tip about the scuba mask de-fog but that raises the same question as Scuba masks usually have real glass in them that can take such things like Rain X with no problems, it's the synthetic and acrylic stuff that it attacks over time. Phantom Fanatic, how long have you been using your preferred De-Fog solution?