Welcome to PhantomPilots.com

Sign up for a weekly email of the latest drone news & information

Extraction of battery - damaging to gimbal?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by aljames, Sep 12, 2014.

  1. aljames

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2014
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    I find the battery very tough to get out of a phantom. Does anyone have advice or tips to make this process easier?

    More worrying is the kick back to the gimbal when removing a battery. It takes some shudder. The tightness of the battery seems ludicrously badly designed in that respect. Anyone worried about damage to gimbal with that?

    Al
     
  2. N017RW

    Joined:
    May 2, 2014
    Messages:
    6,236
    Likes Received:
    1,612
    Location:
    Palm Beach Co.- FL
    See if I can explain...

    >Set phantom on flat surface
    >Grab battery cover with thumb (on top latch release) and forefinger (on bottom) of each hand
    >Rotate wrists so they sort of pry it out against the Phantom body and motor arms to 'break' friction
    >Then slide it out.

    No recoil!
     
  3. ProfessorStein

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2014
    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Have to agree with N017RW.
    While my battery is tough to get out at times, I've never experienced any sort of recoil or shudder for the Phantom itself.

    I'd rather have a battery that's tough to get out, than one that's so loose it falls out... during flight.
     
  4. Happyflyer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,805
    Likes Received:
    98
    Location:
    Cold, Cold, Michigan
    +1
    Works great. There is a video on it, but I can't find it.
     
  5. N017RW

    Joined:
    May 2, 2014
    Messages:
    6,236
    Likes Received:
    1,612
    Location:
    Palm Beach Co.- FL
    Really? :)

    Not that I ever thought I was the only one who has tried/adopted it. ;)
     
  6. Pacific Barbarian

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2014
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    0
    I grab it with thumb and for finger as said until the catch mechanism is free. Then I grab it on the sides and gently work it loose from side to side until its free.
     
  7. BlackTracer

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Messages:
    980
    Likes Received:
    22
    Location:
    Winter Park, FL USA
    +1 I watched that video a while back and it is the expert way to remove the battery. As far as I am concerned there is no other way.
     
  8. MadMitch88

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2014
    Messages:
    539
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Cleveland, OH
    I'm glad I found this dude's video after I bought my Vision+ --- I agree the battery is a VERY tight fit and this method is the only sensible way to extract it.

    I also use a very light spread of Vaseline on the top and bottom of the batteries where the latches scrape and catch --- it really does make it easier to pull them out !! :mrgreen:

    The Phantom 3 needs to have a better design for locking batteries into place. Some kind of twist lever perhaps? I can't see dainty women with long nails being able to pull out these Phantom batteries easily.


    [youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XIperEc05Ls[/youtube]
     
  9. N017RW

    Joined:
    May 2, 2014
    Messages:
    6,236
    Likes Received:
    1,612
    Location:
    Palm Beach Co.- FL
    A picture is worth a thousand words!
     
  10. AndysAdventures

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2014
    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    That's my video. :D

    I'm glad you found it to be helpful.
     
  11. aljames

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2014
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    With the battery latch lock I can't imagine a situation where the battery would fall out. Nevertheless, I'll give that side to side method a go. And thanks for your advices.
     
  12. MadMitch88

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2014
    Messages:
    539
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Cleveland, OH
    Friendly British boozehound Simon Newton made a good video about these tight batteries. I used Vaseline on a couple batteries and it really helped, but I found that it eventually wore off after a few insertions/extractions. So you end up needing to carry around a tube of lube (although some of you already do this with your hyperactive love lives).

    I still think Andy's two-handed technique works well in any situation (is that another sexual joke?). :oops:


    [youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCq9eKYeWto[/youtube]
     
  13. AndysAdventures

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2014
    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    Two handed and dry, that's me alright.

    My grandfather was a two handed dry man, my father was a two handed dry man. It's the family way. :eek: :shock: :oops:
     
  14. ProfessorStein

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2014
    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    This... thread... has... suddenly taken a VERY unexpected turn.
     
  15. MadMitch88

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2014
    Messages:
    539
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Cleveland, OH
    Tight-fitting insertions .... two-handed extractions .... to lube or not to lube .... yep, we're talking about Phantoms!

    :lol: :lol: :lol:
     
  16. Happyflyer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,805
    Likes Received:
    98
    Location:
    Cold, Cold, Michigan
    Simon comes up with many great ones, but grease all over my power plant, no. I will stick with the thumbs and arms method.
     
  17. Pull_Up

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2013
    Messages:
    3,684
    Likes Received:
    48
    Location:
    South Oxfordshire, UK
    Each to their own - if you watch the video the amount of grease used is tiny, just enough to fill the small channel on the battery, and the viscosity means it stays put. I don't even have any on my backpack flight case after putting the batteries in and out... And I can say it's still an easy one-handed operation without any reapplication required. The DJI latch does its job, and my thumbs are looking forward to a much easier winter than they had last year...

    I might have "Friendly British Boozehound" as my epitaph - I like that one! ;)
     
  18. Happyflyer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,805
    Likes Received:
    98
    Location:
    Cold, Cold, Michigan
    Agreed. (not the name, the each his own)
    As for your winter, I once could watch security cameras from a company North and East of London for a couple of years and rarely saw any snow on the ground. Even though you are much farther North than I am. So I guess it only gets cold there?
     
  19. Pull_Up

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2013
    Messages:
    3,684
    Likes Received:
    48
    Location:
    South Oxfordshire, UK
    We don't get much snow down here, but we can get periods of below freezing with great frosts and really clear air -great for filming, not for fingers... Especially for those of us cosseted by the Gulf Stream most of the time.

    This is why when there is a small flurry most of the transport network just falls over. Cold we can do, snow not so much. After much finger numbness last year I'm keeping my gloves on and greasing my batteries. :) (although a freshly discharged lipo did make a reasonable hand warmer once it had been wrestled out)
     
  20. Happyflyer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,805
    Likes Received:
    98
    Location:
    Cold, Cold, Michigan
    I should send you some of mine.
    Pull the battery and drop it: Lost until Spring.
    Now back to topic......
     

    Attached Files: