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ESC to motor wiring question

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Vision + Discussion' started by Jeff48920, Mar 15, 2015.

  1. Jeff48920

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    Although I understand the "vibration and solid core wire" concept, I am having a bit of a problem understanding the "fix" proposed. It seems to me that the highest point of vibration is at the motor not the ESC. Why is a splice a beneficial mod when it seems to be only upgrading the "wire to ESC" connection and ignores the "solid core wire to motor" connection. Also, why doesn't the increased resistance introduced by the splice have a detrimental effect on the information transfer rate between the ESC and motor? Thanks
     
  2. burlbark

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    You are correct the highest point of vibration is at the motor. There are also 3 wires exiting out of the motor that are tied together and supported by a strong plastic bracket on the bottom side of the motor. These wires at that location are also supported by shrink wrap. This causes those wires to move in unison, transmitting that vibration to the next hard anchor point with no support.

    I have seen zero failures at the motor, and there has been zero posted failures on the forums from that location.

    There is no notable increased resistance at these current levels. It is not measurable with my testing equipment, it is only measurable with lab based equipment and mathematical theory. I have been doing these wires for 4 months with zero failures and Hani has also.

    Here is a good read from 10 years ago. http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=252435
     
  3. CapnBob

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    The motor arm is a cantilevered beam.
    Maximum vibration is not necessarily at the motor, depending on frequency.
    There are modes in which the end points are stationary,
    and the center of the beam is at maximum deflection.

    It's all about resonance.
     
  4. CapnBob

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    The motor arm is a cantilevered beam.
    Maximum vibration is not necessarily at the motor, depending on frequency.
    There are modes in which the end points are stationary,
    and the center of the beam is at maximum deflection.

    It's all about resonance.