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Drone batteries catch on fire on commercial flight

Discussion in 'News' started by lutece7, Sep 9, 2014.

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  1. lutece7

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    http://petapixel.com/2014/09/08/pro-tip ... e-on-fire/

    An Australian man learned earlier this year that just because you’ve disassembled your drone and packed it safely away in a number of Pelican cases, it doesn’t mean it can’t cause troubles when undeclared in the cargo bay of your international flight.


    Earlier this year, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) investigated a fire onboard a Fiji Airways flight that was moments from taking off to Nadi from Melbourne. Their investigation determined that the alarming “white heavy smoke billowing” from the plane’s cargo hold had been caused by a number of lithium-ion polymer batteries catching fire. Specifically, lithium-ion batteries which were used to operate a drone.

    Subsequently, the ATSB has issued a warning regarding the lithium batteries, which are susceptible to catching fire when exposed to dramatic changes in temperature and air pressure.
     
  2. ProfessorStein

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    Thaaz why you only pack 2 extras, and take them in your carry on luggage rather than check them.

    I think this is already policy pretty much on all major carriers.
     
  3. cruz_ctrl

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    here's the rest of the article:
    =================================================
    According to the report conducted by the Aerodrome Rescue and Firefighting (ARFF), when the owner of the case — a licensed drone owner — was asked whether any batteries were in it, he said there were not. However, the report goes on to say:

    The ARFF and Australian Federal Police inspected all four of the bags checked in by the passenger and found 19 batteries intact and [an] additional 6–8 batteries that had been destroyed by fire.

    The reports show no sign of legal action against the owner of the multiple cases and vehicles. Instead, the bureau used this as a warning for others looking to transport lithium-ion batteries through checked luggage, be it for drones or other electronics.
    =================================================

    First of all, these were not phantom batteries were they?.
    Secondly, it says batteries may "[catch] fire when exposed to dramatic changes in temperature and air pressure." However, it seems the plane had yet to leave the ground.
    Thirdly, isn't making a false declaration a serious breach of the law?
     
  4. The Editor

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    Personally, I'd make an example of him and throw him inside jail for a year or two for:

    1. Blatantly lying to authorities/security
    2. Should have known better being a "professional"
    3. Clearly concealing the fact he was carrying THAT many batteries
    4. Potentially endangering the lives of hundreds of people

    In fact..... make it 5 years inside and no parole!
     
  5. J.J.B.

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    I certainly think he should be named and shamed as a complete d*ckhead.
     
  6. dlps73

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  7. Meta4

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    25 batteries in checked luggage and another 8 in carry-on!!!
    "An electrical short circuit involving the batteries resulted in the initiation of a fire"
    Makes you appreciate the design of the Phantom batteries.
    If you could afford them (or carry them) you could put 25 in a bag with very little risk of terminals shorting out.
     
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