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DJI Vision Filter mounting kit - in stock at Heliguy

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Vision Discussion' started by Studiowise, Jan 22, 2014.

  1. Studiowise

    Studiowise
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  2. Studiowise

    Studiowise
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    although their site still says stock expected soon!
    Anyone hanging on, i will let you know when i get mine (and if it will be adaptable to use with the Dronexpert gimbal!)
     
  3. Bigvern

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    Hello
    Just received an email from them all sold out ! They only had 4, two weeks they think for more.
    Found some on fleabay bit more expensive 19.99. But I’m so impatient had to order one.
    What fillers will you people be using with these? I will be using polarising one.
    Glen.
     
  4. Studiowise

    Studiowise
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    It's just arrived this morning! Free shipping and next day delivery :)
    Looks like you could be having mine if the gimbal turns up any day now, looking at how I can make an adapter :/
     

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  5. PropsPete

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  6. Studiowise

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    Won't know until Dronexpert gimbal arrives but it looks like I can turn the filter holder 180 degrees and create a mini bracket out of polymorph which will mean i can use my filters AND I will have somewhere to attach my lens hood.
    Why did it have to arrive today along with my new Mobius HD camera. I have sooo much real work to do - AARGH
     
  7. Studiowise

    Studiowise
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    Sorry missed that bit! Yes, polar will be one and I have a few grads which will need a step down ring adapter but should work. Those and a lens hood and i should finally get some O.K video.
     
  8. Bigvern

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    Leave the real work it's nealy the weekend anyway !
     
  9. pault

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    Using a circular polariser will really show off the benefits of having FPV as we will be able to rotate the PV2 to maximise the polarisation effect. It will require more thought when composing shots so that in itself should improve the standard of the photos.
     
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  10. Studiowise

    Studiowise
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    Trust me, i don't need any encouragement to quit working and start playing :lol:
     
  11. urgno

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  12. Pull_Up

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    www.firstpersonview.co.uk are getting some in their next DJI delivery, next week.

    Any pros care to recommend a "starter" kit of two or three filter types to start with and their benefits/uses?
     
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  13. GainfulShrimp

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    A few filter ideas:

    A Circular Polariser (or Polarizer ;) ) can be used to 'tune out' reflections from ground/water. It's the same principle as some anglers use to be able to see into the water (rather than just see a reflection of the sky). The filter comes in two sections and you rotate the front bit to get the desired effect. There's a decent demo of the effect here:

    [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dr-xV33zNBQ[/youtube]

    Graduated neutral density (or ND Grad) filters can be used to darken the sky relative to the ground, so you reduce the likelihood of 'blown highlights', i.e. where the cloud detail is lost because all the clouds are recorded as bright white in the image.

    There are umpteen other types for giving artistic/cheesy effects like halos/star effects around bright light sources, or colouring the light to fake autumn colours etc... :)
     
  14. Pull_Up

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    Excellent reply and very clear demo video, thank you.

    I can certainly see the uses for both the polariser and the ND - not so sure about the more "artistic" options! Thanks again.
     
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  15. GainfulShrimp

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    No worries and I agree completely! A lot of the coloured/special filters are completely redundant in the digital age because you can do it better with software during post production.

    Graduated-ND and Circular Polarisers are different because they give you something that you can't get (fully) in post-production. :)

    Please note: ND filters (without the 'graduated') darken the entire field of view by a uniform amount. They are used to artificially darken an image such as when you want a long exposure during brightly lit conditions to encourage motion blur. (I can't think why you would want to use one on the Vision though.)
    If you want to just darken the sky to bring it more in-line with the brightness of the ground, you need a graduated ND filter.
    Imagine a graduated fill in GIMP or something - where it's transparent grey at the top fading to completely clear at the bottom... that's what a graduated ND filter does.
     
  16. Peter Evans

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    EDIT - Just saw the excellent replies above from Gainfulshrimp after I'd finished typing and pressed 'submit' ! but never mind, here's my two centimes anyway:

    For any type of photography in the digital era you really need only two types of filter: a polarising filter and, possibly, a neutral density filter. The latter (ND filter) comes in two types, normal and graduated. Graduated ND filters are darker at the top and clear at the bottom (with a graduated transition in between). Ordinary ND filters would be of no use on the P2V as they are designed simply to cut down the amount of light entering the lens (necessary if you want to use slow shutter speeds in bright light on still cameras).

    A polarising filter, when correctly aligned in bright sunlight, enhances colour and contrast. In particular, it makes blue skies much bluer and, as a consequence, emphasises clouds. The greens of foliage and grass also become more vibrant and, consequently, outdoor images in sunlight are altogether generally more 'punchy'. A polarising filter is therefore extremely useful for landscape photography (and hence, for P2V images!)

    A polarising filter is also useful for removing unwanted reflections from water and glass and from many non-metallic reflective surfaces such as leaves.

    The filter is fitted into a mount; you then rotate the filter in the mount whilst looking through the viewfinder until you see the point when the optimum polarising effect is achieved (but on an P2V you'd obviously use your LCD to set this up - but read on because there's a caveat.....

    As far as skies are concerned, polarising filters work best when the camera is pointed 90 degrees from the sun. Straight into the sun, or straight away from it, you'll see little, if any, effect. At angles in between you'll see varying degrees of darkening. On very wide angle lenses you can actually see the variance, and this can be a real problem because the phenomena produces an unnatural image with deep blue sky in one part of the image and washed out sky in another, and therefore this is something you need to be careful of when shooting super-wide. In other words, if you're using a polarising filter on a P2V, you'd probably want to go into the app and reduce your angle of view.

    A graduated ND filter is handy when you have bright skies which you want to 'darken' without affecting the exposure of the landscape. They need to be carefully aligned to be really useful.

    Any other effect (and there were dozens of effects filters in the days of film) you can probably achieve in Photoshop.

    DON'T buy a 'protective' filter (skylight, UV) as this will only cause flare in your image/footage

    Hope this helps
     
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  17. Studiowise

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    You can then fix the ISO and force the camera to drag its shutter a little. I use a filter on my GoPro 3B so I can introduce an element of motion blur.
     
  18. Pull_Up

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    Again, thanks to all for the excellent input.

    Initially a graduated ND seems attractive because I've noticed it's very easy for the sky to appear "blown" - however I need to be careful otherwise every video I shoot will end up looking like I'm a wannabe Top Gear cameraman, especially if you move the tilt on the camera so the graduated area isn't on the horizon line. That one's going to be a lot more usable with a 2 axis gimbal, I think (definitely getting twitchy about that Rotorpixel one now!).

    The circ. polariser looks like a no-brainer, to be honest - subject to the excellent caveats I've received from our resident gurus.

    Many thanks all, appreciate your time - especially as I know few of you pros/high-end ams are feeling too happy about your Vision cameras at the moment for your particular purposes.
     
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  19. Mosleyh

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    The one time you wouldn't want to use a polarizer would be if you plan to stitch multiple shots with sky in them. As the camera pans, the angle to the sun changes and changes the intensity of the blue sky, which makes it not stitch smoothly
     
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