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DJI Phantom 3 as a danger example

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by Furia, Jun 2, 2015.

  1. Furia

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    Here is an interesting article about how the aviation industry is looking at the RPAS issue.
    Curiosly they use the Phantom 3 as example of a very capable and dangerous aircraft.

    http://www.ihsairport360.com/articl...t 06_02_15&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua

    As a professional pilot but as well as a Phantom 3 owner I would like to see this activity regulated correctly, without limiting the fun and excitment and freedom of the drone flying but making sure people safety is guaranteed. We all have a say on this with smart and wise flying and trying to spread around the comunity a good and respectful use of the RPAS.
    I think hobby drones and commercial aviaton can nicely live together but it is important that people respect local regulations. Stay away from airports or restricted areas, fly below 400 feet, avoid populated areas and avoid overflying people. The world is really big to fly and film besides those restrictions
    Regulations are better than a ban.
     
    clkilljoy and BGCCDX like this.
  2. Meta4

    Meta4 Moderator
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  3. Furia

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    Well honestly these reports paid by an organization dedicated to support UAS operations are not going to change the Legislators minds.
    Bird strikes are a real fact, ask Captain Sullenberger.
    I fly helicopters for living and I already have had at least 2 and both required helicopter maintenance work. On my company few other pilots had such incidents and one was rendered unconscious by the impact.
    So I would not say birds are not a factor.
    One thing this report does not mention is that birds usually see you and heard you coming and try to avoid you.
    Besides this it is far better to be hit by a bird of flsh and bones than by an aircraft made of metal, plastic and a solid LIPO battery at 150 knots.



    So trying to downplay the possibility of impact and damages it is not a good strategy.
    The concerns are real and the best solution is to work out some reasonable and fair regulations that ensure safety while allowing RPAS pilots enjoying their hobby
     
    ianwood and ViperNuke like this.
  4. Tim D

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    I do believe they will require a license to be put on the Drones.
    Same as 4 wheelers here in Pennsylvania. So they can find out who you are if something goes wrong.
    I am the only person in town as I know, with a Drone, but in 5 years I suspect a few hundred. The government has to step in at some point to regulate the airways. This would be the least intrusive.
     
  5. Daniel Nelson

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    I doubt they would find any identifiable pieces of a UAV in the event of an impact with a manned aircraft.
     
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  6. clkilljoy

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    Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS)
    Sorry did not know what acronym stood for.
     
    Jstic likes this.
  7. damitjim

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    I, for one, would like to see people involved in the hobby to stop screaming for regulations and licensing. If they happen, they happen, but why invite it upon yourself and the rest of us? Do you run around asking for more driving regulations on a regular basis? I'd rather the hobby not get more expensive and I don't need another license in my life.
     
    Jstic and mad in nc like this.