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Crash- Exactly What We Do Not Need

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Discussion' started by Phantom2inVA, May 15, 2014.

  1. QYV

    QYV

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    exactly. almost like that idiot from NYC last september except his crash went all the way to street level and almost killed someone.

    last I heard every metropolitan area in the US was considered Class B airspace and restricted. even if that weren't true, operating a Phantom above a populated area like city sidewalks/streets is irresponsible and possibly it's own separate violation for recklessness.
     
  2. ianwood

    ianwood Taco Wrangler
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    Wrong and no. Everyone who flies a Phantom should learn how the FAA divides up airspace. It is your responsibility as the newcomer to stay clear of all other air-based objects and stay out of restricted airspace.

    So just as a primer, class B, C, D airspace is associated with airfields and not metropolitan areas. And it isn't just a vertical column that goes from the ground to the sky. It has a floor and a ceiling. Sometimes the floor is the ground but many times it isn't. Then if you fly near a metropolitan or suburban area, you need to learn how that airspace is used by things like helicopters, small planes, etc. Learn about TFRs near stadiums and arenas.

    Not only can flying a Phantom in a populated area be done safely and with respect for others, it can be done legally without permits, prior authorization or what have you. Some basics:

    • Do not operate directly over crowds and maintain a buffer space between you and them.
    • Operating over sidewalks or pedestrian areas should be done at sufficient height and in such a way that you can warn people in case of a malfunction. The area should be clear enough that people can move out of the way easily. If the sidewalks are crowded or noisy or you are too far away to intercede quickly enough, they are off limits.
    • Operating over traffic should be done at a sufficient height so as not to distract drivers. If it isn't a Phantom and is much bigger/heavier, it's probably too big for safe operation over vehicles.
    • Always have a ditch point, somewhere you can direct the Phantom in case of malfunction. Be prepared to sacrifice it.
    • Do not operate well above building lines or other ground based structures without an uninterrupted view of the sky to watch for approaching air traffic. Helicopters can and will come out of nowhere. They own the sky. You do not.
    • Use high visibility strobes for any twilight or night operations.

    This was shot the other week in downtown Los Angeles while two curious LAPD offcers who happened to roll by just before take off watched in utter fascination.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. QYV

    QYV

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    fair enough. I know a few of the cities I've looked into were all class B but I guess that was due to airports. Just curious, did you get those basics from somewhere specific like a FAA website or are they just personal guidelines? I'm specifically wondering about your item about sidewalks and populated areas and how you could accomplish "warning people", both in terms of time and distance.. If you're flying above a city several hundred meters from your own position and suffer a malfunction or anything like that there's no way you're going to be able to warn anyone under the craft, furthermore once a Phantom begins to plummet you've really only got moments unless you're WAY up, and then lord knows where the wind is going to take it.

    my point is, flying anywhere over people is dangerous especially in an urban area and the FAA absolutely is going after people who crash in cities for "carelessness and recklessness". imho any good Phantom pilot will always be thinking if you suffer an engine or other failure at any given moment what am I going to crash onto below? If the answer is people (crowd, sidewalk, etc) then I wouldn't be there.
     
  4. MrMcfly

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    Cities are not only FAA regulated. There are City implemented restrictions, such as in NYC, where ALL UAV aircraft are
    restricted on the island of Manhattan. It's not an FAA restriction. IF you're going to THINK about flying in a Metropolitan
    Area, be sure you know ALL the rules for that area... remember, there are heliports on top of buildings & hospitals.
    It's good to keep in mind that tall buildings create crazy wind patterns... it's not a friendly flight zone. Pilot beware!
     
  5. jason

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    Hope you looked at the date that was posted. Looks like we have another member whos was late for the party. [​IMG]
     
  6. MrMcfly

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    DOH!!! :confused: