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Contacted Air Traffic Control

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Vision Discussion' started by Stufft, Apr 4, 2014.

  1. Stufft

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    Location:
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    I am wanting to take some footage of the Glasgow Tower, the only problem being, it is directly across the river from Glasgow Heliport. I dropped by today and spoke to one of the pilots (air ambulance) and asked if he had any issues with this. In his eyes, if he knew what time I was going to be there, him and the rest of the pilots would keep an eye out for the P2V. I also said I would land as soon as I heard any helicoopter activity.

    The pilot wasn't keen on giving a straight forward go-ahead but instead sugggested I contact air traffic control as the area around the heliport is restricted airspace. After what seemed like hours on the phone to Glasgow airport I got to speak with someone at ATC who then gave me an email address at NATS to request permission. Email has been sent off and I'll let you know what the response is.

    On a positive note, the man I spoke to at ATC did thank me for contacting them and seemed to be very helpful in trying to get me clearance.

    :edited for typo:
     
  2. pault

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    Good luck - as you said i am sure they would want to help but of course they have to go by the book. Very interested to hear the outcome.
     
  3. Stufft

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    Got a reply aready -

    We cannot permit you to operate inside Controlled Airspace without a letter of agreement. This takes at least 30 days to process. Can I also ask if you are an approved CAA pilot to fly UAVs? So unfortunately, we cannot approve your request to fly on Saturday.
     
  4. gpauk

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    Well, that's not surprising I guess, that they can't move quickly.
    A moderately positive response though, sounds like you may well get it in due course...
     
  5. Boozshey

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    I am an air traffic controller. I even got denied getting permission to fly at a small regional airport that on an old inactive runway that we rent to race our real cars on. No higher than the trees and lower and more controlled then all the birds. Still got a no. I even stated I would request a TFR or proper paperwork for a NOTAM. I still got a no.

    However, the reason I was given was because they had some problems in the past with an RC Airplane club and they'd rather not deal with it.

    As a controller (15 years) I don't care what's around my airfield as long as it's coordinated and two way communications can be achieved via radio or phone. Furthermore there are no regulatory guidance prohibiting a "controller" from allowing it to happen.

    My point is, ATC can't help you. The airport manager/ATC manager is who can. I don't know the specifics of the UK, but that's how it would work in the US and our FAA rules vs PANOPS/ICAO rules are very similar.
     
  6. FlyingFox

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    I have contacted the CAA to enquire about becoming CAA approved, and they sent me a load of information, which I'm still digesting,
    1. Obtain your BNUC-S by Carrying out ground school and exam (2 days) apx £1000. (And pass it)(they do these all over the UK)
    2.Write operations manual and keep flight logs! I think a flytrex would suffice .
    3.Register for CAA permission for aerial work £120 apx form srg1330
    Receive permission for aerial work for each aircraft you wish to use.

    There is a great deal more to it too, medical stuff, eyesight, lot of reading and safety knowledge to be acquired including "types of cloud, and map reading" some legislation and then you may be permitted to fly in public areas on a single occasion, you can apply for a year but will have to satisfy you are suitable.

    This is for the UK only..and for pilots intending to fly commercially or for gain , otherwise the other normal rules apply, ie not to go within 50 metres of people ,buildings etc and no camera.

    Something I am considering to do.

    Oh I have not read it all yet, there will be other stuff too.
     
  7. Stufft

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    If the P2V never had the camera it wouldn't be classed under the "data aquisition" rules and we'd be able to fly almost anywhere. It's the camera that throws up different rules.
    See the table on this page http://www.caa.co.uk/default.aspx?catid=1995&pageid=11185

    As for obtaining qualifications, the CAA website also links to Resource UAS http://www.resource-uas.co.uk/ who provide training courses, again they're around £1300.

    For the sake of maybe a 10 minute youtube clip I think I'll forget the whole idea of filming the tower. I'd be cheaper booking a flight on one of the helicopters and pointing my video camera out the window! ;)
     
  8. PropsPete

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    Location:
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    I live about 1 mile from small local airport. It's only for general aviation purposes and there are something like 10-20 active pilots using that airport. There's no ATC and it's maintained by local club. There is a radio frequency to announce take-offs and landings so I bought a radio scanner for airbands.

    That way I can monitor the pilots and their intentions to land or take-off. This will help me to avoid certain areas if I want to fly my P2V near the airport. There are actually two areas reserved only for RC-"pilots" at the airport which was quite surprising.
     
  9. tfiset

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    You must learn airspace regulations before flying. Its like driving a car without learning the laws of the road, you must learn the laws of the air. Flying UAS(s) around small rural airports are most likely Class G airspace, and legal (but stupid and dangerous). Flying in Class B, C, D, or E airspace is completely illegal. Class B is going to have the biggest effect on people, as most large cities in the US have Class B to the ground. That means absolutely zero flying in cities like New York, Boston, Washington DC, Miami, Chicago, LA etc. To everyone, just learn the rules and we will be fine.
     
  10. dkatz42

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    Not sure what the rules are in Finland, but it is perfectly legal in the US (if not that common) for aircraft to be "NORDO" (no radio), particularly in aircraft like Cubs that don't have electrical systems, antique planes, etc. Most pilots in the US carry portable radios for safety's sake, but not always. Be careful out there.
     
  11. Meluk

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    and is this what specialist aerial footage companies do in the uk?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  12. NELSON

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    In Canada we need to request a SFOC special flight operating certificate and follow all rules, application, file a NOTAM.
    Let nav Canada know of your flight plan. Ask permission to smaller ports and usually all is good to do your pic, real estate pic etc