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Class E Airspace

Discussion in 'Rules and Regulations' started by Daniel B, Jul 27, 2016.

  1. Daniel B

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    What are the rules when flying in class E Airspace?
     
  2. N017RW

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    You should Google that.
     
  3. Daniel B

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    I already did and that is why I am here.
     
  4. LuvMyTJ

    LuvMyTJ ADMINISTRATOR
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    It is a pleasure to welcome you to the Phantom Pilots forum Daniel. I hope that you will take advantage of the benefits that come with membership and that you will be able to use the forum for the exchange of innovative ideas and as a resource for current developments in Phantom quadcopter’s.

    Here is a few links and some other class E airspace help.

    This from Wikipedia, clear as mud :) Try the video below.

    "Controlled airspace which is neither class A, B, C nor D.[8] In most areas of the United States, class E airspace extends from 1,200 feet (370 m) AGL up to but not including 18,000 feet (5,500 m) MSL, the lower limit of class A airspace. There are areas where class E airspace begins at either the surface or 700 AGL, these areas are used to transition between the terminal and en-route environments (around non-towered airports). These areas are designated on sectional charts. Most airspace in the United States is class E. The airspace above FL600 is also class E.[8] No ATC clearance or radio communication is required for VFR flight in class E airspace. VFR visibility and cloud clearance requirements are the same as for class C and D airspaces when below 10,000 feet (3,000 m) MSL. Above 10,000 ft MSL, the visibility requirement is extended to 5 miles (8 km) and the cloud clearance requirement is extended to 1,000 feet (300 m) below clouds, 1,000 feet (300 m) above, and 1 mile (1.6 km) laterally.[5]"

    SkyVector: Flight Planning / Aeronautical Charts

    Flight Planning and Filing Pilot's Guide | SkyVector

    AirMap.io



    Screen Shot 2016-07-27 at 7.53.36 PM✨.png
     
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  5. BigAl07

    BigAl07 Moderator
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    Depending on specifically where you're flying you can't get into Class E airspace because it starts higher (except as noted above some exceptions) than our community based guidelines allow.

    Excellent links and details above by TJ.
     
  6. N42742

    Approved Vendor

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    Under Part 107, you will have to have ATC authorization to fly in Class E. But like BigAl said, Class E only gets down close enough to the surface to be an issue around some airports. Consult your sectional chart. Dashed magenta lines outline ares where Class E dips down to the ground.
     
  7. N42742

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  8. Richard R

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    one of the reasons that reading sectionals will be part of the test. Near my home, Springfield Airport (KSGH) class E airspace has a keyhole type shape and extends fro the surface (SFC). I would have to contact Dayton ATCC to fly in that space. Again, info that you get from the sectional chart.
     
  9. qrandle

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    I'm a little confused cause the 107 Study Guide from the FAA states this: "In most cases, a remote pilot will not need ATC authorization to operate in Class E airspace."

    So what are those most and not most cases?

    Q
     
  10. bluesgeek

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    ATC approval is needed only when flying within the lateral boundaries of a Class E airport. (Because that is the only time Class E airspace goes from the surface. Otherwise it usually begins at 700' AGL or 1200' AGL—well above the 400' limit for sUAS under Part 107.)

    This is an important one because you'll find yourself in a Class E area but from 700' or 1200' up usually, and not needing ATC approval.

    Sarah Nilsson - UAG Test Prep

    Also important is to know that Class D airports with part time towers usually become Class E airports during the hours when the tower is closed.

    Suggested (re)reading is LuvMyTJ's post from above.
     
    #10 bluesgeek, Sep 9, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2016
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  11. qrandle

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    Thanks. This is all what I thought and had studied. I was just hearing some contradictory things. Thanks.
     
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  12. N42742

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    Possibly a minor point, but an important distinction - they don't >usually< become Class E. They are just as likely to become Class G. The only way to know is to look up the airport in the Chart Suppllement - A/FD.
     
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  13. bluesgeek

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    That's good to know. And that the AOPA flashcard for Class D does not mention the distinction you cite is a good reason to do just as you have said, consult the Chart Supplement.

    Thanks very much for clarifying. I have part time towered Class Ds in my area so I will be sure to look them up.
     
  14. Richard R

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    Class E (sfc) usually is used around airports that no longer have a control tower or one that operates part time, but for which instrument approach procedures (IAP's) have been published (KSGH is one example). This is to insure that the approaches are clear for aircraft on Instrument flights.
     
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