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Can we fly in National Parks if there is no TFR?

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Vision Discussion' started by Jeremyconk, Feb 17, 2014.

  1. Jeremyconk

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    Just what the subject asks? I live in Oregon, and would love to take this to Crater Lake, there is no TFR (total flight restriction) over the area...
    Trying to find solid info can be sketchy....

    So what's your thoughts on the subject....
     
  2. MedX172

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    Well, it's been my experience that the FAA designates minimum altitude flights at times over different National Parks, wild life refuges, etc. I would recommend checking Skyvector if you're really curious. However, on February 15th, President Obama signed a law protecting model aviation, stating that it is better regulated by local communities than the FAA [Paraphrased]

    I would call the National Park system to ask them if there are any restrictions about aerial photography.

    http://www.modelaircraft.org/files/media_release-Pres_signs_bill.pdf
     
  3. GlowFET

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    I've worked for the U.S. Forest Service for 25 years as an Electronics Technician. Now retired.
    My advice to you is: 1. Do your home work. Check the information page on their web site first. Get the phone number and name of the Park Ranger's office and give him a call. Start a dialogue and get to know him.

    2. Be polite. Ask questions and give him time to answer. Explain what it is you wish to do and assure him that you are not going to endanger the other visitors or property. If you can get his email. Send him pictures or short video of what you've done before. Also a Picture of the craft showing the scale. Did I mention Be Polite? Ask if there is any time that you might be able do this that will not detract from the other visitors experience and enjoyment. Such as, early morning or late afternoon.

    3. Offer to share the results. Each Park and Forest has a Web presence and would love to have pictures and short video's of the POI's. If they do, then follow thru. Send them as much as you can. They will love it. I know my home Forest does.

    I've worked with many a Ranger from Park Service along with the LEO's from U.S. Forest Service. They are good people doing a tough job and are in most cases very understaffed. They are also very proud of their Park / Forest and really only have the safety of the visitors in mind at anytime.

    I hope this helps
    Mike
     
  4. jetswing

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  5. johan

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    The question has already been answered. But for the record, the acronym TFR stands for temporary flight restriction. Total flight restriction would suggest that no one could fly there. Aircraft can and do legally operate within the bounds of TFR's all the time. TFR's are not put into place to keep everyone from flying there. They are only put into place to keep those without permission (i.e. you and me) from flying there.
     
  6. EV2

    EV2

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    It is technically not a no fly zone. As quoted above, you cannot launch, retrieve, or operate from the park, but it does not prevent flying over the park If operated from outside the boundary. But, in order to comply with other rules such as line of sight,etc. it is effectively close to the same thing.
     
  7. SteveMann

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    Yes, but "Line of Sight" is not a rule. Yet.