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Can someone tell me what's making my video look like this?

Discussion in 'Photos and Video' started by tsmost, Jan 3, 2016.

  1. tsmost

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    We do have a bit of snow on the ground, but videos taken after most of it has melted have produced this same quality. Most of the videos are choppy and super well lit like this one. Videos taken at various times in the day, all same results. Super frustrating. Thanks in advance for the help.

    SkyPixel
     
  2. dreck

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    way overexposed adjust your camera settings, first thing i would suggest is turning your iso down to 100
     
  3. m0j0

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    Not an expert on flying but I do know about video. The cameras on the Phantoms are fixed aperture at 2.8. You can't close it in to reduce the light hitting the sensor. You can control ISO (sensor sensitivity) and shutter speed (how long the shutter is open). I would say when you are in good light the sensor should be set a 100. Then shutter speed adjusted up to you liking.

    Truly if you want great smooth video you will need to invest in some ND Filters (sunglasses for you cam).

    This is a real basic explanation...
     
    Mcj321 likes this.
  4. Rick D Imagery

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    This looks simply like a case of an overexposed video most likely due to the camera being in manual mode. In very well lit scenes you want your ISO around 100. I just picked up my very first P3S on Christmas and am also getting familiar with the settings and flying but I do have experience in photography. Once in the DJI GO app look on the right side and move the slider button to video, then click the button below the record and play buttons that has the image of three sliders on it. Once in that menu make sure that the button on top is moved to the left onto the Auto setting and not to the right on Manual unless of course you prefer to shoot in Manual mode. If you prefer manual shooting then just make sure that you have the correct exposure for the scene that you are shooting. There are three ways to control the amount of light that reaches the camera sensor to obtain a correctly exposed photo or video. First is the shutter speed, second is the ISO setting and third is the aperture. The shutter speed is simply that, the speed at which the shutter opens and closes. The faster this happens, the less light can reach the sensor. If too fast the photo/video may be underexposed if the other two methods, ISO and Aperture cannot compensate. The ISO is basically how sensitive the sensor is to the light. The higher the ISO number the more sensitive the sensor is to light. The aperture or F-Stop is the size of the opening in the lens that lets the light in to reach the sensor. A larger aperture allows more light to reach the sensor. I believe the Phantom has a fixed aperture of 2.8 which means that this variable cannot be changed in order to obtain a correct exposure. A 2.8 F-Stop or aperture means that the opening that allows the light to enter is very large. The lower the F-Stop number the larger the diameter of the opening, the higher the number the smaller the opening. On the Phantom, you have to balance this 2.8 F-Stop with the shutter speed and the ISO. In Auto mode the Phantom camera will do all of this for you and you will have a correctly exposed photo/video almost all of the time. I say almost because in certain situations and lighting conditions the sensors that calculate the light entering the cameras lens have to take a best guess to obtain a correct exposure. Some shots that have very dark areas and also very light areas in a single scene can be difficult to correctly expose, or sometimes you may have an idea on what you want your shot to look like but the auto mode may not live up to your expectations. That is why most professional photographer prefer to only shoot in manual mode or some form of it.
    I know....a very long winded explanation when I could have just said...overexposed, push button to auto mode, but I got a little carried away...lol. Hope this helps you and anyone else that may need the info out a little bit.
     
    Mcj321 likes this.
  5. m0j0

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    I will add. ND Filters are necessary to get the optimal results from your cam. The phantom is not equipped to handle occasions where too much light is available. For natural video the shutter speed should be 2 times the frame rate..for example 1080 60fps you should set your shutter speed to 120 or the number closest to 120. If you are setting it to 1000 you will introduce new issues. My suggestion is get some ND filters and use them to lower the amount of light captured.

    However if you aren't looking for fanntastic video and you are fine with just ok video... Use Auto... If you truly want to get everything you can out of the 4K camera get some ND FILTERS you will notice a big difference.