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Can cloverleaf antenna be used for WIFI?

Discussion in 'FPV (First Person View)' started by April151, Jul 20, 2016.

  1. April151

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    Hello,I hope somebody can help me out.
    Is a cloverleaf antenna (that is used for FPV applications) good for home wifi?


    The cloverleaf antenna is a circular polarized antenna which is way better than the cheap whip antenna that comes with most transmitters. In fact it is one of the best FPV video transmitter antennas available to hobbyists at the moment. I explained the benefits of a circular polarized antenna over a linear one if you are not sure what are the differences.
    Any suggestions will be very helpful !
     
  2. Mark The Droner

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    Looks like you copy and pasted the second paragraph from somewhere.

    It can be used but I wouldn't expect it would be better than linear since your receivers likely are designed to receive linear wifi. Depending on where your transmitter is located, you might try a windsurfer. I did and it works great!
     
  3. PTCX

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    A home wifi network will work perfectly well with dipole antennae (Stick/Whip) as all the units,TX & RX,are static,not moving,so circular polarisation is not neccessary.
    Most home wifi setups have two dipole antennae per unit,for best results have one pointing vertically and one pointing horizontally.If only one antenna point it virtically.

    Circular polarised antennae like the cloverleaf design work better than dipoles in FPV aplications because they radiate the signal more or less in every direction,omnidirectional,so when a multirotor tilts as it moves the signal is always being sent directly toward the receiver.
    With a linear polarised dipole the signal is being radiated directionally in a flat plane so when a multirotor tilts the radiation patern tilts as well and the signal can be harder for the receiver to pick up.

    Think of it as the CP cloverleaf has a big round ball around it and the LP dipole has a big flat disc around it.

    This video explains in more detail;