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Boscam TS352 TX 500mw

Discussion in 'Photos and Video' started by zoochase, Mar 4, 2014.

  1. zoochase

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    Soooo, what happens when you accidentally power on the Boscam TS352 TX 500mw TX without the antenna attached? :(
     
  2. ladykate

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    If you do it longer than a few moments, you let the smoke out.

    If it didn't fry, then put an antenna on and smile.
     
  3. zoochase

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    So by "smoke out" you mean fan no longer turning and unit no longer transmitting? :cry:
     
  4. ladykate

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    Yes. All electronics have a certain amount of smoke in them. If you let the smoke out, then they no longer work. If your tx has let all its smoke out then you have to buy another. (old electronics addage. no insult - we've all done it).
     
  5. zoochase

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    Sad day. You would think with all this technology available there would be a way to idiot proof things like that. I wasn't thinking about the TX when I powered up to upgrade firmware. Grrrr. Time to up grade to the 600mw now I guess.

    Thank you ladykate.
     
  6. ladykate

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    Yep. Lessons like this live with us for a while. And then we do it again. ;-}

    I zapped my home thermostat by walking across the rug and touching it. That was yesterday. I just sprayed the floor with a solution of fabric softener and water. Simple and well known solution but one I didn't employ even though I knew the cold weather was causing huge static sparks. ****... Seems well known lessons have to be relearned occasionally.
     
  7. jondrew

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  8. ladykate

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    Take the space out between urban and dictionary and the link works (corrected in this quote). Smoke escaping can be expensive... once let all the smoke out of an aircraft computer when I dropped a pair of safety pliers into the innards while repairing it - kinda embarrassing.
     
  9. jondrew

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    We've probably all had those experiences. Possibly the worst being this one (no, this wasn't me):

    On September 18, 1980, at about 6:30 p.m., an airman conducting maintenance on the Titan II missile dropped a wrench socket, which fell about eighty feet before hitting and piercing the skin on the rocket’s first-stage fuel tank, causing it to leak. The commander of the 308th Strategic Missile Wing quickly formed a potential-hazard team, and by 9:00 p.m., the Air Force personnel manning the site were evacuated. About one hour later, Air Force security police began evacuating nearby civilian residents as efforts continued to determine the status of the missile and the fuel leak.

    Senior Airman David Livingston and Sergeant Jeff K. Kennedy entered the launch complex early on the morning of September 19 to get readings of airborne fuel concentrations, which they found to be at their maximum. At about 3:00 a.m., the two men returned to the surface to await further instructions. Just as they sat down on the concrete edge of the access portal, the missile exploded, blowing the 740-ton launch duct closure door 200 feet into the air and some 600 feet northeast of the launch complex. The W-53 nuclear warhead landed about 100 feet from the launch complex’s entry gate; its safety features operated correctly and prevented any loss of radioactive material. Kennedy, his leg broken, was blown 150 feet from the silo. Livingston lay amid the rubble of the launch duct for some time before security personnel located and evacuated him. Livingston died of his injuries that day. Twenty-one people were injured by the explosion or during rescue efforts.


    Now that's letting the smoke out big time