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Bench Test all P3P Video Modes to YouTube

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by envisionabove, May 25, 2015.

  1. envisionabove

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    Location:
    Tim in San Diego
    Sunny San Diego ( Yeah right It's been overcast with Rain/Drizzle/Cloudy & Cold.)
    So I did this this morning.... Results lead to 1920 fps60 They were all shot with ISO 200 1/100 manual no flight just used my hand to move it about in the same location. Notice the stiletto effect on the higher 4K modes.

    File Information Test Info.JPG
    These have all been populated to YouTube, if your interested.











    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OgCT53OJxnw

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iaDLARm6MeY

    The last two are 48 and 60

    Tim
     
    #1 envisionabove, May 25, 2015
    Last edited: May 25, 2015
    Fplvert likes this.
  2. DrChris

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    Thanks for the comparisons! This type of experiment can be helpful.

    If I understand shutter speed and video correctly (explained very well in the video link below), the shutter speed should be more than half of the frame rate. In other words the denominator of the shutter speed should never exceed more than two times the number of frames per second.

    For example, if the frame rate is 30fps, you should never have a shutter speed faster than 1/60 (so 1/50 would be ok, 1/100 would cause the stuttering effect).

    So, in the above examples, I would expect some stuttering for all except the 60 fps example since they're shot at 1/00.

    Again, the explanation is well done in this video starting at about 21:00. But basically, if the camera is recording a very short slice in time (1/100's of a second) just 24 times each second, moving objects appear to jitter or stutter from their position. If the shutter speed is longer, each frame will blur just a bit but this will smooth out the transition from one frame to the next.

    This is where ND filters come into play. On a bright day, you simply can't shoot video at 1/50 speed because everything will be overexposed. If you darken the lens with an ND filter (or 2), the camera can shoot properly exposed video at a much slower shutter speed thus smoothing out the video.



    This helped me. I hope it helps you guys too!

    Chris
     
  3. envisionabove

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    I agree 100% with you! Ralf does a wery wery good job... :) That's were I messed up? thanks to you for the extraction of that tip. I will do again... If I went below the threshold of 1/100 it was so dark? Anything I'm missing?
     
  4. loganboyd

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    When I film video with my DSLR I always manually set my shutter speed to twice as fast as my frame rate. 1/60th for 30fps, 1/50th for 24fps.