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Battery storage condition

Discussion in 'Phantom FC40 Discussion' started by slothead, Aug 17, 2014.

  1. slothead

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    I am sure that I read somewhere here in the forum that batteries should not be stored in a charged condition, but now I can't find that statement anywhere.

    The problem that it creates for me is that I don't have time to charge batteries and then go flying all at once. Up until a week and a half ago I kept batteries charged so I was always ready to go flying when I found a chance. I have not flown since then (and since letting down my batteries to half-charge) only because of this threat of charged storage risk.

    Can someone point me to the charged storage caution, and does it apply to the P2V+ Smart battery too?

    Thanks,
     
  2. J.James

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    from what I understand is that all lipos hate being stored at full charge for any long period of time. Even the P2V+ Smart battery too

    Tho there are varying schools of thought on what is the best % of charge to keep in a storage charge state. Some say 40% some say %50 others %60 and others say they are ok if left fully charged for up to a week others push it to 2 weeks. then there are still others that really want to take the best care to avoid degradation of there battery's and dont recommend more the 3 or 4 days.

    But dji and other sources say you should also very the storage charge every time. Like 40% one time and 50 or 60 another time. SO i would say that any thing between 40% to 60% is ok And if you want to have them charged and ready to go when you want to fly a few days of being at full charge will not hurt them much. you also can store them in a fully charged state much longer if you put them in a zip lock bag with all the air squeezed out and store them a refrigerator. When not in use tho you need to let them warm up to room temp before using them or opening the bag so they dot get condensation on them.


    Some thing I have noticed on my battery's about charging them before flying. to is that i get the most flight time out of a battery if I use it within a few hours of coming off the charger. So I have gotten in to the habit of trying to charge them fully before I go out flying. SO they have as much power in them as they can have.
     
  3. mikey

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    Tom,

    I've been wondering the same. Especially since it seems my flight time has dropped since I first used it.. seems to be getting worse and worse with every flight.
     
  4. Lonewolf

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    That's an old trick that has been debunked several years ago when people thought putting their D, AA, & AAA batteries or even their coffee in the fridge to preserve them. The number one battery killer is subjecting it to cold.
     
  5. N017RW

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    Tom there are lots of articles 'out there' regarding LiPo care.

    If you Google it you'll be able to read and judge for yourself what is the best way to maintain them.

    The rule of thumb for years (and times and technology changes) has been never store a LiPo in any state other than 50% or about 3.7 - 3.8/cell or 11.3- 11.4v for a 3S pack like the P2's. This is no-load voltage after resting for about 1.5 hr after discharge or charge.

    Now the term 'store' means different things to different folks but a week or two should be max.

    Except for the storage charge or level function, the 'intelligent' feature and supplied charger are supposed to take care of the rest of the LiPo use & maint. issues for us.
     
  6. J.James

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    From the tiny bit of stuff I do know about lipos its been proven that storing them cold helps slow down the chemical reaction that causes lipo battery's degradation when in a storage state. Tho storing them fully charged in the cold very well could cause them to lose some charge and using them cold will also not give you the best output. BUT heat is a bigger killer then cold is. You definitely dont want them to get to hot when they are being charged or discharged.
     
  7. gutterboy44

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    So for long term storage, should the batteries be charged up for an hour or two after a flight where you fly until the second voltage warning?
     
  8. J.James

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    You could charge it up full again then fly it again soon after it bring it down to you are back down to about the 40- 60% level.

    But it would be easier to charge it after you fly and only charge it back up to a about 40%-60% then take it off the charger and store it. Tho if you have no way to check the voltage as its charging you would need to guesstimate it and take it off before you get the blinking light that tells you its hit the 75% level on the dji charger.
     
  9. Lonewolf

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    I'm not here to argue with you but, it's been proven that today's batteries should not be subjected to storing them in the cold. Yes, heat is a factor as well as cold. However, cold does NOT prolong the life of the battery. Look it up for yourself per Energizer.com as one source of substantiating my fact.

    Furthermore, once removed from the cold condensation damage is inevitable. Just like putting ice in a glass of water. Once a cold item is subjected to the warm air, condensation will immediately result. There is virtually no way to prevent it unless it's in a vacuum.
     
  10. J.James

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    Thats exactly why you should never store them cold unless they are in a sealed bag with all the air removed out of the bag. and dont open the bag and let any air in when they are cold. or you WILL get condensation on them.
    am



    If I have my guns or ammo out in the cold and bring them inside If keep them in there storage bags or ammo cans I cant open them till they are back at room temperature or they will get condensation on them which is way way not friendly to guns or ammo.
    But the same principle. Even if you are ever out in the cold weather and flying it would be a good idea to have your battery's stored in some type of bag or container with very little air in them till they are back to room temp before taking them out and letting most air hit them.
     
  11. J.James

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    So cool or warn debait aside. and on to charge levels for storage charge. What is the optimum voltage to store them at for storage for more then just a few days. and is there a different levels that are better then another depending on if its going to be a real long storage or not? like would it be better if you know its going to be few months such as when winter comes. and you dont antisipate flying till spring again. Would it be better to store at 60% so that any self discharge lose would still not fall below the 40 or 50% charge voltage over the time its stored?
     
  12. N017RW

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    3.8 per cell is about what all of mine have been at time of purchase.