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Battery options?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by phantomflyer, Jan 2, 2014.

  1. phantomflyer

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    Never really knew what the C rating was in a lipo battery and kind of still don't other then it has something to do with discharge rating so my question is how high can you go? DJI battery is 20C can I use a battery at 30C or 60C? The reason I ask is because I've seen a neno lipo battery that has 4500mah with 30C to 60C! Does the discharge means that it pushes out the juice to quick to make a difference in flight time and could burn out your Phantom?
     
  2. OI Photography

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    This is a great guide that will teach you all you need to know about Lipo's: http://www.rchelicopterfun.com/rc-lipo-batteries.html

    The "C" rating has nothing to do with temperature, it's an indication of how much current the battery can deliever (or receive, when you're talking about charging). The battery never "pushes" the electricity to the system, the system draws it out of the battery.

    The "20C" number you see on the stock battery (for example) refers to how fast it can supply electricity to the system. Increase in that current draw occurs when the motors or other items are revved up or increase their demand. Batts need to be able to supply the current at or above the rate the system draws it. Batts labeled "30C-60C" mean they can deliver 30C under normal conditions, but up to 60C in short bursts.

    1"C" = the battery's mAh divided by 1000. Therefore, 1C for a stock Phantom battery is 2.2Amps. 2C = 4.4Amps, and so on. Batteries can be charged at 1C or multiples of that, but only those that are rated for 2C or higher charging should be done at those values.

    I charge my Phantom batteries at 1C (2.2A), but I think they can handle 2C. The MadDog 2700mAh batts are rated (I believe) at up to 5C, which would be 13.5A, but I still charge them at close to 2C usually (5Amps).
     
  3. phantomflyer

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    Thanks, I've found that the 4500 won't do due to the size.
     
  4. Fotovalpen

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    How is the flight time affected by increasing the C rating?

    Lets say we hover the Phantom with the stock 2200 20C battery and get 7 minute flight time. Will I get more or lest flight time by using a 2200 35C?

    I have upgraded my Phantom with the Zenmuse, 2.4G ground Control, DJI FPV kit and T Anti Gravity motors. I have also added double battery holders and want to increase my flight time as much as possible.
     
  5. phantomflyer

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    From what I understand is the C rating has nothing to do with how much more or less you get for flight time! I got the dual battery mounts expecting I would get a lot more flying with two battery's but found I didn't get a hell of a lot with two battery's since I added more weight I lost that extra time. Since then I took them off and fly with one battery, Plus I figure if she come crashing down it wouldn't be as heavy when she hit the ground or another person if the worse where to happen. But in all honesty I think the two battery deal is a waste of time in trying to get more flight time you may only get a couple extra minutes but working you motors harder!! That's just my take on the matter, I'm sure others will differ.
     
  6. OI Photography

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    It isn't, at least not directly.

    It does indicate how much of a steady current the battery can provide, so a higher C rating means it can still deliver steady power when the load increases more. The only reason you need a higher C rating on your batt is if your aircraft needs more overhead in the power supply to handle more current.

    Pilots who use batteries with a high C rating may be inclined to push things a bit harder, which could result in reduced flight times over more conservative flying, but other than that there's no real connection between C rating and flight time.
     
  7. Fotovalpen

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    Thanks!

    What kinds of thing can one do to increase flight time?