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Bad Rap could be turned into a good Rap

Discussion in 'News' started by ACLV, May 27, 2014.

  1. ACLV

    Jan 29, 2014
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    Drones are really getting a BAD rap from a lot of sources.

    I was talking with my friend and he has a Teenage Daughter. He was wondering if these could be used to watch his Daughter on her dates?

    What do you think? Dad in the SKY!!!

    I think we can think up of all kinds of SPYING capabilities that are good.
    Gee! we could even sell Franchises.

    chuckle chuckle
  2. Ozzyguy

    Dec 6, 2013
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    Ambulance and other emergency services could use a UAS to fly ahead of a vehicle and give real time traffic updates of the route ahead.
  3. DrJoe

    Apr 13, 2014
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    Our kinds of drones will not become the "Model T" of the sky and gain popular acceptance until they include 3 things:
    1. Redundancy.
    2. Autonomous avoidance capabilities.
    3. Government ability to track/identify.

    As to redundancy, many labs like the one in Budapest and the GRASP lab of UPenn have perfected algorithms to allow a four motor multi-rotor to land under control after losing one motor or prop.

    As to avoidance, those same labs, as well as some start up companies have come up with small hardware add-ons to allow autonomous and controlled drones to avoid obstacles and other drones, including the ability to "swarm".

    You have to register your car and boat, right? Governments are going to require registering your drones too. Government ability to track can be achieved using a few methods, but likely with ADS-B broadcasts. There are very small transmitters now available, and they are getting smaller all the time. Big brother and local law enforcement is gonna want to know who's drone was looking through the second story window of someone's house. With this technology, suspected illegal activity will be easy to trace using a track-able database. Homes could also have a simple receiver to allow it to track and identify any drones within its privacy bubble.

    All the technology is here and ready, or nearly so. It will require corporate backing like the push from Amazon to get it going, as well as the enthusiast community. One day, either DJI or another company will package all this and ship it to you for $1,500 and you will have a redundant, traceable, multi-rotor with autonomous avoidance capabilities. The airspace between 300-400 feet will swarm with autonomous and user controlled drones. Its coming.