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Bad ESC?

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by sprkn_ranger, Jul 3, 2016.

  1. sprkn_ranger

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    So I just got a phantom 3 pro about a week ago, and my dumb *** hit a power line with it on my 3rd flight. It fell about 40' to the hard dirt below and flipped up in its lid and it took me about 5 to 10 seconds or so to get the motors shut down using left stick down (should have used the csc). Anyway, I bought a new shell and 4 new motors (lots of dirt in motors from upside down in dirt) and got it all fixed and went to test it and I'm getting the ESC error now. I've heard of people having smoke come out of their motors from being stalled after tipping over and their ESC's are fine.
    Does anybody have any ideas for me to test or trouble shoot the ESC's before I drop the money on a new board (part 96). By the way, I didn't solder the new motors on to the board, I spliced and soldered the wires together so I didn't have to deal with a bad solder joint from the glue they put on the boards.
    Thanks for any input!!
     
  2. With The Birds

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    I learnt here last week the fly leads on the motors are enamelled wire (the motor winding wires extended).

    If you didnt remove the insulation from the individual strands you will be dealing with bad solder joints and open circuits.
     
  3. alokbhargava

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    Do all motors try to spin when you switch it on? That will help you localize the problem probably.
     
  4. sprkn_ranger

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    So after I remove the colored insulation, the two little individual strands within the colored insulation has more enamel on it that needs to be removed?

    That may explain why I was having such a difficult time getting the solder to flow on the wires.
     
  5. HWCM

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    You need to solder the wires directly to the board. Splicing wires is a bad idea. It is much cleaner and much easier to solder directly to the board. That white silicone comes off really easily. Then just clean up the solder pads with some flux. You might be getting ESC errors due to high resistance of the wires not being soldered well enough. If you could not get the solder to flow, then you probably do not have a hot enough iron, Then you will have a cold solder joint which will break from vibrations and you will have another crash. Have someone with the right equipment show you how to fix it. You will save yourself a lot of trouble. As you can already see.
     
  6. HWCM

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    They are not enameled, it just takes a hot iron to get the solder to flow through all those thin wires because the wire dissipates the heat so quickly.
     
  7. Rideswings

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  8. HWCM

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    Those should get hot enough. Maybe you need to use a wider tip or just hold the heat on the wire longer.
     
  9. sprkn_ranger

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    Well I pulled all the old wires off and scraped the enamel coating off the new motor wires (something definitely came off the wires) and soldered them directly to the board. Fired it up and crossed my fingers and hot **** it worked!! Thanks for all the replies guys I really appreciate the advice.
     
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  10. HWCM

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    What came off was probably a coating that is used in the manufacturing process. Good job!
     
  11. sprkn_ranger

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    Thanks! I'm pretty happy that I don't need to buy a new board now lol. Now I just need to wait for the wind to die down
     
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  12. With The Birds

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    I am sorry however you are wrong.

    The individual strands are seperately insulated.

    The coating is almost certainly not enamal. So called enamelled wire is a commonly accepted general term often applied to wire used in motor and transformer windings.

    The individual strands are the same wire used to form the motor windings and brought out to form the fly leads which have the insulation removed and are timned with solder in preperation for, and the convenience of, termination.
     
  13. With The Birds

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    Correct.
     
  14. HWCM

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    Yes
     
  15. With The Birds

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    I agree the termination is best made at the mainboard terminals best electrical continuity and mechanical reliability. Where I have had the need to connect so called enamelled wire (inductor and audio amolifier transformer windings) to stranded copper I dipped the end in molten solder first (remove insulation and tinned in one operation). Made for a reliable connection however not a practical or necessary consideration in this instance.