Welcome to PhantomPilots.com

Sign up for a weekly email of the latest drone news & information

Are FPV goggles recommended for filmmaking?

Discussion in 'FPV (First Person View)' started by stepstone, Feb 11, 2015.

  1. stepstone

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2015
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Haven't even bought my Phantom yet, but am looking for advice on what I need. I'll be using it for filmmaking and music video purposes mostly.

    So I'm basically asking - does FPV help with filmmaking?
     
  2. QYV

    QYV

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2014
    Messages:
    1,814
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    NYC
    Re: Is FPV recommended for filmmaking?

    Assuming you're getting a non-Vision series Phantom 2 which will utilize a GoPro, FPV is essential. without it you have no way of seeing what the gopro sees so you're just guessing where the camera is pointed. live FPV allows you to see live through the gopro and know exactly what you're shooting

    Vision series have (short range) FPV "built in" so to speak, but the camera isn't really pro level, it's hobbyist class (lower resolution and framerate).
     
  3. stepstone

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2015
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks QYV. I should have said FPV goggles. I'll edit the post heading. I know that you can add a phone to see what the camera sees, but I was wondering if FPV goggles would be better for the filmmaking side of things. I'll be using a GoPro.
     
  4. QYV

    QYV

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2014
    Messages:
    1,814
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    NYC
    ah yep that's a little different. real quick - the only way you'll use a PHONE and app for the FPV is if you get a Vision series Phantom 2, which I already mentioned doesn't really have a camera suitable for professional work. If you're getting the gimbal/gopro, you'll have to install your own (or have someone install for you) 5.8Ghz FPV broadcast kit. That will include an iOSD mini, FPV transmitter, plug and play cable, and some sort of display, there are a few recommended models we can get into later but the point is they have 5.8Ghz receivers built right in so you just attach an antenna. You will NOT just broadcast live to your phone or tablet.

    There's a stickythread in this FPV Forum called "lowest prices on components" that may help you understand everything involved.

    anyway all that being the case, I feel like having a nice display mounted to your RC would be preferable to goggles, goggles are for guys who want an immersive flight experience at shorter range, displays are easier to go longer range because (imo) it's easier to keep track of the Phantom and keep your long range antenna pointed at it... with goggles you can easily lose track.

    Displays are also handy so other people could see... for example my director stands right next to me looking at my screen so he knows exactly what I'm filming. sure you could buy multiple displays and give him a separate one if you want goggles, but unless you're trying to be immersed in the flight experience I just think a display is overall easier.
     
  5. stepstone

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2015
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks again QYV, that's exactly the info I was after. A screen it'll be. I'll check the thread you mentioned to narrow my search a bit more. Thanks for the help.
     
  6. QYV

    QYV

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2014
    Messages:
    1,814
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    NYC
    my pleasure. remember you'll be broadcasting a signal that any compatible device can pick up, so you can have multiple screens if you want, goggles and screens, whatever. if you need any help feel free to ask, and if you happen to be in or near NYC I'd be happy to assist with the actual build... it's really easy though we have plenty of non-techie hobbyists around here that do it every day
    :)
     
  7. wkf94025

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2014
    Messages:
    608
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    St. Helena, CA
    I respectfully disagree with QYV on a couple points. I fly with Fatshark Attitude SD goggles, and with a Lilliput monitor, tripod mounted. My smoothest footage without question is from being under the hood (i.e., goggles). Though there are times when flying near obstacles where glancing between P2 and screen is critical to collision avoidance. I often power up both goggles and monitor because redundancy never hurts, especially when flying BVR. I mount monitor on tripod as I don't like weight on radio. I also use a Duo receiver when I want to DVR the flight and/or fly 2km+. Another dissenting opinion/experience: for long range I use the goggles with my helical gun. I find it easy and fun to fine tune empirically the optimal antenna orientation by drifting my head left/right and up/down, searching for the image sweet spot as I fly.

    So much of this is personal preference, really. Just get good gear, especially antennae.

    My dos centavos...
    Kelly
     
  8. QYV

    QYV

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2014
    Messages:
    1,814
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    NYC
    I respectfully disagree with people here all the time, other opinions are always welcome :) you're right it can boil down to personal preference and totally agree that redundancy is good.
    I've also felt some seriously heavy screens mounted to RCs, but I find my RX-LCD5802 is light enough I can fly 4-5 batteries and not get tired or sore... I also think a lanyard is a critical component.

    the "having to search with your head to find better signal" was exactly the type of thing I was thinking the OP would NOT want to be doing while he's trying for a professional shot... although I guess you could do that work beforehand. To be fair, all the movie work I've done has indeed been at relatively short range not like, flying off over 1km before worrying about setting up a precision shot. I've had shots where I move forward or backward for that far, but just up in the air flying straight not like, hardcore obstacle flying that far away know what I mean?

    anyway like we've said antenna are key, and heck remember it's a open broadcast signal so you can always pick up additional goggles/display later it's super easy to just have more receivers.
     
  9. jason

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2014
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    404
    Location:
    Commerce Twp,MI
    I found a good use for my Canon camera strap which is now attached to my carbon fiber monitor mount. So yes a lanyard is a critical component and far easier carrying around than a monitor mounted on a tripod.
     
  10. Crazykaktus

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2014
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have a PH2 with a Fatshark Dominator 2 Kit - I shoot mainly for broadcast - Action sport and documentary stuff... Its the only way to go - If you can't see what your filming you will be wasting your time. Its all down to learning the limitations and ability of the craft, and then learning to control it. If you want to get a creative rotation shot you need to understand what you want to do and you need the skill to pull the shot. So when you get your kit - don't even put the gimble on.... Fly with no FPV and learn to to low level stuff - flying around cones - nose in figure 8s, yaw tracks etc.... Once you can fly technical stuff put on the camera and get the fpv on - know that if you put it down hard with a gimble on you will probably have the gimble as a box of spares... So spend the time and learn to fly first - or you might be tossing hard earned cash away.

    Personally I cannot fly with the screen - I have both - Even with screen covers and shaders I find it extremely difficult to work with anything but the goggles. Had a few incidents where seeing detail was important - and found the screen did not show it very clearly - So I opted for goggles - I can still pop a screen on through the goggles vid out - its your call of preference