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Anyone trying to save our hobby???

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by PhantomFanatic, Nov 26, 2014.

  1. PhantomFanatic

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    Is there an organization that supports us drone fliers? I'm referring to an orginazation that actually lobbys for our rights. In Ham radio, there is such an organization. If there was ever a time to have someone stand up for our hobby, it is now! I'm really worried about the FAA's decision. If they are seriously considering requiring a pilot's license to fly a drone, commercially, that tells you a lot about their thinking, or lack of.

    In ham radio, there is an orgianzation called the American Relay League. They fight hard, to keep us on the air and they support our frequency bands that we currently use. Membership is reasonable and for your membership, you get a monthly magazine.

    The same could be done for our hobby. At least we are getting a magazine for drone junkies. They would be a perfect canidate for what I envision. If I had the funds, I would do it myself. As a whole, a small donation per flier could accomplish a lot.

    Your thoughts are welcome.
     
  2. PsychopathRC

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    Would be great! A drone union!
     
  3. knuckles

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    Well we have the AMA and they had been challenging the FAA I thought on behalf of hobbyists. They helped from the last broadcast to get 30,000 comments I think it was to challenge the FAA interpretation of the special rule.
    There are several groups that filed lawsuits against the FAA regarding rules / laws around UAVs.
     
  4. LandYachtMedia

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    +1 - In the USA its the AMA for the hobbyists.

    There is a bit of a vacuum right now in the USA for the commercial side of the fence. There is one that I'm keeping my eye on though (http://www.acuas.org/).

    If anyone finds credible organizations out there they should list them up.
     
  5. SteveMann

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    I am aware of six organizations that pretend to the throne of representing commercial sUAV operations, but that should be in a separate thread because the OP specifically said "Hobby"

    Hobby flight is what the AMA is for - the recreational hobby flyer. Their motto is to promote recreational and sports use of model aircraft, so if you fly your drone for recreational use, you absolutely should be a member of the AMA.

    The AMA has a historic hostility toward sUAV operations, even outright banning multirotor aircraft at some of their fields. The middle name is "Model", and our vehicles are not models of anything. The AMA may be changing their position on sUAV’s, at least at the top levels of the organization, but only to the extent of accepting them for recreational use. Local clubs may continue to forbid them on their fields.
     
  6. PhantomFanatic

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    If the AMA is banning multi-rotor aircraft at some of their fields, they certainly don't sound like an organization that I wish to support.

    (For the hams out there, I meant to say: The American Radio Relay League.)
     
  7. MacCool

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    For a good illustration of the AMA's concept of typical drone operations, look at AMA Document 550. They don't quite get it. We have no organization to act as standard bearer, and I doubt that we would want the AMA to be such. Unfortunately, when the FCC and FAA want opinions on sUAV operation, the AMA is where they'll go.

     
  8. LandYachtMedia

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    I don't see where either of those requirements is an indication they are "ANTI" drone.

    Letter b) is going to be in the regs for commercial operations. FPV is cool but its never been allowed as the sole means of operating a RC craft on any flying field that I've attended. Putting cameras on aircraft isnt something that has just arrived on the scene with drones. ITs been common with the RC community for a number of years. I have a micro camera and transmitter setup that is at least 7rs old. The AMA are and always have been big on LOS control. It does state you can fly FPV with a spotter. That in my opinion is a reasonable requirement.

    The privacy section isn't a AMA thing. What they are siting there is common law. They are adding their own layer of approval on it but its not anything new.
     
  9. MadMitch88

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    They can NOT require a pilot's license to operate a drone (commercially or private use) because a drone is NOT a manned aircraft. That's like saying you need a commercial driver license to operate a little plastic toy RC semi truck. Are you really this clueless, bubsy ??

    It's anyone's guess what is coming down the pike --- but at the very worst I do see some kind of certification required to operate one commercially because future UAV's will be quite large and therefore, a lot more dangerous if it crashes down on someone's head. It will most likely operate just like a driver's license --- each certification requirements will be slightly different and up to each state government's "UAV Board" and there will be designated test centers in each state where you need to take your machine and fly it with an instructor testing you on basic maneuvers.

    Being able to fly it out long distance using FPV would require some kind of higher certification process --- proving that you know how to operate the FPV equipment and avoid hitting cell towers, water towers, skyscrapers, etc. Getting FPV certification likely means you can charge a much higher fee for your services! :p

    As far as private use in your backyard --- I don't see how any govt. agency can force you to get a certification for that. If you buy a motorcycle and never leave your property --- you don't need to get a license to drive it around your backyard !! Why would they require you to get certified to fly a toy in your backyard? Just use some common sense.
     
  10. Timtro

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    I beg to differ on the statement that FAA "cannot require a pilot's license to operate a drone" commercially.

    Check the last bullet point in the last part of section 9.1.1.1 of the AVIATION SAFETY UNMANNED AIRCRAFT PROGRAM OFFICE AIR-160 Interim Operational Approval Guidance 08-01 (page 15):

    For the PIC (Pilot In Control) to be exempt from the pilot certificate requirement … the PIC must have successfully completed, at a minimum, FAA private pilot ground instruction, and have passed the written examination. http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org...tions/uas/coa/faq/media/uas_guidance08-01.pdf That document is from March of 2008. We can consider that the starting point for the current rule making process.

    The FAA is currently in the process of basically coming up with modifications of about a dozen related rules to accommodate commercial UAS operation: from things like providing exemptions for operating for "hire" by pilots with other than a commercial rating, to providing for N number application at an appropriate size and location, along with setting requirements for basic aeronautical knowledge and skills, which usually involve verification by testing of some kind. There are "written" exams for "sport" and ultralight pilots, and there will likely be a similar process for commercial UAV operator licensing.

    We may see the Notice of Proposed Rule Making as soon as December, but the process will still take several more months, even after the standard 60 day comment period, to complete.
     
  11. SteveMann

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    The OP specifically said "Hobby".

    Other than defining some terms and codifying AC 91-57 , the FAA is unlikely to regulate hobby flight.