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Airmap and no-fly zones

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by PeteyGoesToUtah, Dec 1, 2015.

  1. PeteyGoesToUtah

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    I won the lottery to The Wave at the Utah/Arizona border, which is also in the Vermillion Cliffs National Monument / Coyote Buttes North region. I've used Airmap, Hover, and a couple other 'go-to' apps to check if I am restricted from flying in these areas. I know we can fly in National Forests, and NOT in National Parks...but what about Monuments (this place in particular). Attached is an image from Airmap and the area I'm going. I turned on every feature that Airmap has, so it should show if there was something. Thanks for the help.

    Screen Shot 2015-12-01 at 11.38.19 AM.png
     
    Ariel@Hivemapper likes this.
  2. Jeff48920

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    National Monuments are part of the National Parks System.
     
  3. PeteyGoesToUtah

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    ****...thanks for the quick reply.
     
  4. RadRich

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    Does the National Park System cover nature preserves as well?
    I went over a local preserves guidelines and FAQ and didn't read anything about drones being prohibited.
    In the meantime, I sent them a carefully worded email (i.e. stated aerial photography) if this activity is prohibited here.


    Visitor Guidelines: Rules of the Preserve (Guidelines | Cosumnes River Preserve | FAQs | Cosumnes River Preserve)
    The Preserve was established to protect the unique and rare habitats and wildlife of the Cosumnes River floodplain.
    As such, visitors should use good judgment when recreating on the Preserve. Visitor use is concentrated on the two
    developed trails around the Visitor Center to limit disturbance to these habitats and wildlife species. All Preserve rules
    are established for the benefit of the resource and/or for the enjoyment and safety of those who want to experience nature.
    Rules are plainly posted at the kiosks and in the trail brochure available at the Visitor Center.

    Visitors to the Preserve should keep in mind the following guidelines:

    • No walking along flooded impoundment’s during the wet season. It scares up the waterfowl, which is a drain on their energy resources. Birds can
      be viewed from established trails and viewing areas.
    • Respect “Area Closed” signs. Public access is restricted and/or forbidden at several sensitive habitat areas.
    • Limit your disturbance to habitat and wildlife by staying on established roads and trails.
    • Do not approach, handle or feed any wildlife you may encounter.
    • Refrain from moving too close to dens or nest sites.
    • Leave seemingly abandoned wildlife alone. If you are concerned about an animal, report its location to Preserve staff or a volunteer on duty.
    • Be aware that poison oak, stinging nettle, poison hemlock, ticks, rattlesnakes, and mountain lions make this habitat their
      home.
    • Domestic pets and horses are not permitted on the Preserve.
    • Hunting, fishing, camping and launching of gas-powered motorized boats are not allowed at the Preserve. It is legal to fish or hunt from boats, in
      the river, a state navigable waterway, but only during the proper seasons and with the proper license(s). There are no restrictions to motorized
      boats on the Cosumnes. However, motorized boat use is difficult due to shallow and varying water depths and vegetative overgrowth.
    • Do not litter. The rule is to pack out everything that you packed in! As such, garbage cans are NOT made available for
      the public or for field trips. The Preserve does provide garbage bags in a dispenser on the Visitor Center deck, in case
      someone forgot to bring one of their own.
    • Collecting is prohibited (feathers, rocks, reptiles, plants, etc.).
    • Smoking and fires are not allowed on the Preserve.
    • Bicycles are not allowed on the trails, but can be locked up at the Visitor Center.
     
  5. PeteyGoesToUtah

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    I would think this would be a definite no-go, as there many ways you could do damage if you lost it...not to mention, that you wouldn't be able to retrieve your quad if it went down in most cases.
     
  6. Jeff48920

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    Some U.S. Nature preserves are governed by National Park Service. Some are governed by National Forest Service and some may be governed by private organizations like the Nature Conservancy. Other preserves are locally or state regulated (eg Chicago Forest Preserves).
     
  7. DanWyns

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    the map of my area sucks

    [​IMG]
     
  8. RadRich

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    I'm thinking so, too. It's like, "if you have to ask, then..."

    Here's what it looks like from above. Not much difference than the public parks by the American River further north. Remember, I got a Standard, so it's not going so far that I wouldn't be able to find it. Plus, the RTH feature has been working very well.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Ariel@Hivemapper

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    Somebody using Hivemapper recently flew in that general area (link to map) and they reported an issue about a private and mostly unused airport, but did not report any other issues about flying in that area. Not the definitive answer you are looking for but a signal from a fellow flier who recently flew that area. If you do end up flying that spot and have any issues please do report them on Hivemapper so we can help the rest of the community.

    (Full disclosure I am building Hivemapper)


     
  10. RadRich

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    This article may have answered my question. The Preserve is currently using Phantom 2's to assess the area.

    "At the Cosumnes River Preserve south of Sacramento, where a levee was recently removed to allow flooding to resume its natural, historic pattern, scientists use a drone to see if their efforts are paying off. They previously would have had to eyeball the flooding from the ground – not the most accurate way to measure it – or hire an airplane to fly over.

    “If we had to hire a pilot, the time flexibility might not be there,” McColl said. “The drones allow us to be really responsive after storm events because we need to be there within hours to catch certain flood levels.”

    At the Cosumnes River Preserve, the conservancy is using a Phantom Vision 2 drone that sports four propellers and a GoPro camera attached to a gimbal.

    Total cost: $1,400. The costs of repeat flights are minimal: manpower and battery juice. In contrast, hiring a pilot to fly over the site can run anywhere from $1,500 to $3,000 per trip.


    The drone has the potential of paying for itself in just one trip. It also gives the conservancy complete control over the images captured. The only limitations are short battery times and noise levels.

    Although small, the Phantom Vision 2 emits a high-pitch whirring sound that scares off sandhill cranes, McColl said. Quieter drones are available in the form of a fixed-wing model that is quiet and has not scared birds, but those drones cost $10,000 to $30,000 each

    Read more here: Drones are latest tool in conservation science"​
     
  11. jaywils

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    I think the no-fly zones make sense but the regulations are only going to get tighter. My greatest fear is that someone uses a MR, or a fleet of MRs, as some kind of a terrorist act, and it's only a matter of time. Then it will be Game Over.